white tail deer hunting (firearms) - november

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  • chilipeppermaniac

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter

    I believe this is found above.

    • Archery equipment may be used to hunt deer during all of the deer hunting seasons. This includes the Junior Deer Hunt Days. Hunters may only use long bows or recurve bows during the Primitive Deer Hunt Days.
    • Muzzleloading firearms may only be used to hunt deer during the Muzzleloader Season, Firearms Season, Junior Deer Hunt Days and Primitive Deer Hunt Days. Hunters may only use flintlock or sidelock percussion muzzleloaders during the Primitive Deer Hunt Days. Muzzleloading revolvers are prohibited during the Primitive Deer Hunt Days.
    • Shotguns or rifles and handguns that fire straight-walled cartridges may be used to hunt deer in all counties during the Firearms Season and Junior Deer Hunt Days.
    • Rifles and handguns that shoot bottleneck cartridges may only be used to hunt deer during the Firearms Season and Junior Deer Hunt Days in certain counties and areas (see map and description, Hunting Regulations).
    • Air guns that shoot bullets, arrows or bolts may be used to hunt deer in all counties during the Firearms Season and Junior Deer Hunt Days only.
    • Deer harvested must count toward the bag limit of the season in which they are taken, please note:
      • Deer harvested with archery equipment during the antlerless-only second split of the early Muzzleloader Season in Region B must count toward the Archery Season bag limit.

    I also often wondered about the use of handguns in the past, but erred on the side of I would not carry until confirmation of below.

    • Firearms or airguns may not be carried while hunting deer during the Archery Season with the following exception. In Deer Management Region A, persons 21 years old or older may carry a handgun for personal protection against bear while hunting deer during the Archery Season.
    • The handgun:
      • May not be used for hunting any game species while the person is archery hunting for deer;
      • May not have a barrel length of more than six inches;
      • May not have a telescopic sight or electronic aiming device attached; and
      • May not be used to kill wildlife wounded by a vertical bow or crossbow.
     

    chilipeppermaniac

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    I understand. I currently have an ar15 and I believe if I’m reading Maryland law correct 556 with more then 60 mg powder is allowed with certain casing.

    I mentioned ar15 because my wife won’t let me get another rifle.

    1) So is there anyway way I can make my ar15 legal for white deer hunting?
     

    chilipeppermaniac

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Post number 15 in the Deer and 5.56 question post above.


    New to the AR and hunting the first question would be how good a shot are you, the second how good at range estimation, third any experience following a blood trail, and last will you suffer from buck fever?

    To answer your question is it possible? Yes it is possible but not a high percentage shot especially with your choice of ammunition and would not be recommended for a novice. A good recommendation would be to try to hook up with some experienced hunters and go hunting with them to learn the ropes. There is a lot more to ethical hunting than just killing an animal. Which shots to take and which to pass up have a lot of variables as you have seen posted and each situation is unique. Hunting is tough to learn without a mentor fortunately many experienced people are willing to pass on what they have learned. Have you ever field dressed a deer?
     

    aznboi87

    Active Member
    BANNED!!!
    Aug 29, 2023
    253
    rockville, md

    I believe this is found above.

    • Archery equipment may be used to hunt deer during all of the deer hunting seasons. This includes the Junior Deer Hunt Days. Hunters may only use long bows or recurve bows during the Primitive Deer Hunt Days.
    • Muzzleloading firearms may only be used to hunt deer during the Muzzleloader Season, Firearms Season, Junior Deer Hunt Days and Primitive Deer Hunt Days. Hunters may only use flintlock or sidelock percussion muzzleloaders during the Primitive Deer Hunt Days. Muzzleloading revolvers are prohibited during the Primitive Deer Hunt Days.
    • Shotguns or rifles and handguns that fire straight-walled cartridges may be used to hunt deer in all counties during the Firearms Season and Junior Deer Hunt Days.
    • Rifles and handguns that shoot bottleneck cartridges may only be used to hunt deer during the Firearms Season and Junior Deer Hunt Days in certain counties and areas (see map and description, Hunting Regulations).
    • Air guns that shoot bullets, arrows or bolts may be used to hunt deer in all counties during the Firearms Season and Junior Deer Hunt Days only.
    • Deer harvested must count toward the bag limit of the season in which they are taken, please note:
      • Deer harvested with archery equipment during the antlerless-only second split of the early Muzzleloader Season in Region B must count toward the Archery Season bag limit.

    I also often wondered about the use of handguns in the past, but erred on the side of I would not carry until confirmation of below.

    • Firearms or airguns may not be carried while hunting deer during the Archery Season with the following exception. In Deer Management Region A, persons 21 years old or older may carry a handgun for personal protection against bear while hunting deer during the Archery Season.
    • The handgun:
      • May not be used for hunting any game species while the person is archery hunting for deer;
      • May not have a barrel length of more than six inches;
      • May not have a telescopic sight or electronic aiming device attached; and
      • May not be used to kill wildlife wounded by a vertical bow or crossbow.
    Yes I understand there’s a different season for “firearm” hunting that’s why I included in the “firearm” in the title.
    “Handgun” refers to pistol I believe not ar15.
     

    TwinTurbskis

    professional amateur
    Jun 9, 2020
    306
    Derwood, MD
    I understand. I currently have an ar15 and I believe if I’m reading Maryland law correct 556 with more then 60grain is allowed with certain casing.

    I mentioned ar15 because my wife won’t let me get another rifle.

    1) So is there anyway way I can make my ar15 legal for white deer hunting?

    2) I don’t eat deer meet so whatever I killed can be given to the person. Who lets me tag along. I am new at this so I doubt I’ll get any on my first trip

    3) thanks to people on here I understand I will need to take hunter license course

    4) I’m sure the infield safety course will be very similar in terms of safety for ccw that’s why they allow us to be exempted and I believe many of the safety rules are the same (don’t point your gun at others, safety on until ready to fire, have your rifle pointed down, keep your mag unloaded until you’re in position, I’ll keep my rifle in bag until situated.)

    It really seems like you just want to shoot a living animal with your AR. And then you expect the person who lets you tag along to deal with all the post-shot work.
     

    gwchem

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Dec 18, 2014
    3,493
    SoMD
    If you don't eat deer meat, you shouldn't hunt. It's that simple. You're just asking for advice on how easily to kill an animal.
     

    aznboi87

    Active Member
    BANNED!!!
    Aug 29, 2023
    253
    rockville, md
    If you don't eat deer meat, you shouldn't hunt. It's that simple. You're just asking for advice on how easily to kill an animal.
    That’s why it’s called “sports” not hunt for food.

    I’m sure there are someone out there doesn’t mind bring home extra meat for their family.
     

    chilipeppermaniac

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    And Post 51 has some good merit as well.


    OP - if you have to ask the question, then you do not have the experience to make the shot. I think most have already alluded to this, but you need to know your ability and the ability of your equipment. Just because you are shooting a .338 Lapua does not mean you should take a 1,000 yard shot. Your ability might not be up to par with your equipment.

    At 30 yards, I have no issue putting a bullet where it needs to be. Thing is, I'm not sure I would take that shot with a .223. I'm also not a big fan of neck shots. Just because I am not a fan of necks shots, does not mean they do not work. Lots wills swear by them. Lots will also swear by the .223. Neither the .223 nor the neck shot is for the novice out hunting deer. Neither leave much room for error. If you were out hunting with me on your first hunt and I was sitting next to you, I would be telling you to wait. I know, it is tough. I went through it with deer and with turkeys. When that tom came in and would not stop walking, the guy I was hunting with kept telling me to wait. I kept telling myself that I could bust that tom's head like a clay pigeon that I do all so often. I ended up watching that tom walk off. Sometimes, you just have to let them walk. Other times, you take the shot only to have to track them for a while and learn a hard lesson about your ability and/or your equipment's ability.

    You will have your mistake moments if you do enough hunting. If somebody has never had a mistake moment, they have not hunted enough. No ethical hunter likes those mistake moments, so we practice and practice to make sure we know our equipment, we know our ability, and we can improve our ability.

    Good luck hunting.
     

    aznboi87

    Active Member
    BANNED!!!
    Aug 29, 2023
    253
    rockville, md
    And Post 51 has some good merit as well.


    OP - if you have to ask the question, then you do not have the experience to make the shot. I think most have already alluded to this, but you need to know your ability and the ability of your equipment. Just because you are shooting a .338 Lapua does not mean you should take a 1,000 yard shot. Your ability might not be up to par with your equipment.

    At 30 yards, I have no issue putting a bullet where it needs to be. Thing is, I'm not sure I would take that shot with a .223. I'm also not a big fan of neck shots. Just because I am not a fan of necks shots, does not mean they do not work. Lots wills swear by them. Lots will also swear by the .223. Neither the .223 nor the neck shot is for the novice out hunting deer. Neither leave much room for error. If you were out hunting with me on your first hunt and I was sitting next to you, I would be telling you to wait. I know, it is tough. I went through it with deer and with turkeys. When that tom came in and would not stop walking, the guy I was hunting with kept telling me to wait. I kept telling myself that I could bust that tom's head like a clay pigeon that I do all so often. I ended up watching that tom walk off. Sometimes, you just have to let them walk. Other times, you take the shot only to have to track them for a while and learn a hard lesson about your ability and/or your equipment's ability.

    You will have your mistake moments if you do enough hunting. If somebody has never had a mistake moment, they have not hunted enough. No ethical hunter likes those mistake moments, so we practice and practice to make sure we know our equipment, we know our ability, and we can improve our ability.

    Good luck hunting.
    Thank you for your insight.

    If I’m “experienced” I wouldn’t come in here and ask questions.

    Currently I can hit a 5x5in at 30 yards but haven’t really tried up to 100 yards since there are no outdoor range near me.

    What’s the average distance for hunting? 100 yards?
     

    chilipeppermaniac

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Yes I understand there’s a different season for “firearm” hunting that’s why I included in the “firearm” in the title.
    “Handgun” refers to pistol I believe not ar15.
    Yes, I know you are aware.

    I mostly posted the Handgun part for any and all who may have wondered in the past and/or present, the current regulations and where it can be found, re: having a handgun on one's person while doing hunting in areas where bear are present, hunting with a bow etc.
     

    aznboi87

    Active Member
    BANNED!!!
    Aug 29, 2023
    253
    rockville, md
    Yes, I know you are aware.

    I mostly posted the Handgun part for any and all who may have wondered in the past and/or present, the current regulations and where it can be found, re: having a handgun on one's person while doing hunting in areas where bear are present, hunting with a bow etc.
    From my understanding is that “handgun” is for self defense against wild life but not used for haunting while it’s the “archery” season
     

    chilipeppermaniac

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Thank you for your insight.

    If I’m “experienced” I wouldn’t come in here and ask questions.

    Currently I can hit a 5x5in at 30 yards but haven’t really tried up to 100 yards since there are no outdoor range near me.

    What’s the average distance for hunting? 100 yards?
    In my experience while hunting either alone or alongside a buddy or 2, Deer can be taken at as close as 20-30 yards ( some of my archery shots have been in that range) on out to 70-300 yards.

    I haven't taken any out past maybe 150 yards, but my buddy who shoots a 300 Win Mag has. He sometimes hunts on different "fields" properties, vs the "woods" properties I hunt where a 150 yard range puts me into neighboring farm fields/woods across property lines from where my stand is.
     

    chilipeppermaniac

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    From my understanding is that “handgun” is for self defense against wild life but not used for haunting while it’s the “archery” season
    Correct.

    Although certain handguns ARE permitted during firearm season in the designated Zones where rifle is permitted.

    For example Thompson Center Encore, Contender in many good calibers, or 44 Mag for example if the ammo and barrel length etc complies with the minimum FPS muzzle velocities.
     

    Biggfoot44

    Ultimate Member
    Aug 2, 2009
    34,112
    It really seems like you just want to shoot a living animal with your AR. And then you expect the person who lets you tag along to deal with all the post-shot work.

    For the moment , I'll give benefit of the doubt , that as a rookie , he'd like an experienced person to stand over his shoulder , and give pointers on cleaning , dragging , etc .
     

    Biggfoot44

    Ultimate Member
    Aug 2, 2009
    34,112
    In my experience while hunting either alone or alongside a buddy or 2, Deer can be taken at as close as 20-30 yards ( some of my archery shots have been in that range) on out to 70-300 yards.


    Oversimplified ( with occasional exceptions ) .

    Thick woods or brush - Limited by Visability . Zero to 25 yards - ish.

    Open woods - Rare to be more than a hair past 100 yds . 50 - ish probably average .

    Open fields or powerline right of way ( with you concealed just inside cover , looking both ways - If the deer are behind you , see brush above . If the deer are in the open , limited by your marksmanship . With .223 specifically , very precise shot placement is the order of the day . With .223 , retained energy will become factor before trajectory .



    For .223/ 5.56 deer ammo , your looking for either 64 gr - ish bonded soft point , or the monolithic " X Type " bullets .
     

    chilipeppermaniac

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    For the moment , I'll give benefit of the doubt , that as a rookie , he'd like an experienced person to stand over his shoulder , and give pointers on cleaning , dragging , etc .
    I was fortunate in my hunting development to have been at home in the woods from a young age of around 7-8 years old when I began fishing with some fathers of friends, and also when iI began attending a YMCA day camp in the summers of 1972 and 1973. Not only was the camp offering activites such as horse back riding, arts and crafts, field games, swimming and swimming lessons, basketball, but also events such as capture the flag and time spent in coolness of the creeks, and streams on that property in Butler Md.

    I would spend as much time as possible throughout my childhood pursuing adventures in and around woods, farms, and anywhere outdoors that I could access by foot or bicycle. Any hunting I did, was not official hunting with weapons of any kind, short of my cub scout pocket knife and fishing tackle. As I may have mentioned in other threads over the years, much of my youth was one of humble and limited means as both my dad and mom grew up with rather poor upbringings. My hunting was mostly not to kill and or eat any animals, but to FIND various critters and even other cool stuff. I rather enjoyed finding crayfish under rocks in the streams, salamanders, tadpoles, frogs, snakes, and of course catching fish.

    These childhood foundations led me to take my interest in shooting friends' bb guns to the next level when I was around 22 years old and purchased my first firearm. A Remington .22. After about 8 more years, I bought my first house and by around the fall of that year I got my Hunter's safety course under my belt and got my first deer rifle. Within the next few years, I had secured places near my house with permission to deer hunt these few properties. It took a few years before I would get my first deer, which was not with my rifle. This was a managed hunt in Cecil County which was shotgun county at that time and place. By that time I had acquired my 1st bow and Mossberg shotgun to use in the shotgun counties.

    Needless to say, I did not hunt for sport or for trophies, I hunted for deer meat. The "sport" of hunting for me were the fringe benefits, hiking, climbing, packing out the deer and time spent in fresh air and nature.

    I am pretty sure these are the reasons many of us are hunters and outdoorsman.
     

    chilipeppermaniac

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Oversimplified ( with occasional exceptions ) .

    Thick woods or brush - Limited by Visability . Zero to 25 yards - ish.

    Open woods - Rare to be more than a hair past 100 yds . 50 - ish probably average .

    Open fields or powerline right of way ( with you concealed just inside cover , looking both ways - If the deer are behind you , see brush above . If the deer are in the open , limited by your marksmanship . With .223 specifically , very precise shot placement is the order of the day . With .223 , retained energy will become factor before trajectory .



    For .223/ 5.56 deer ammo , your looking for either 64 gr - ish bonded soft point , or the monolithic " X Type " bullets .

    Yup, oversimplified and certain details left out by me, in " mine and my friend's experiences"

    My yardages obviously are based on conditions and choice of weapon as dictated by seasons/locale/ etc.

    In my case, Weapon of choice ranged from Bow, Shotgun( slugs), Rifle 44 Mag lever, .270, 30-06 and finally Muzzleloader.

    I will let Biggfoot44 and other AR type users, address their use and range etc, since I have really no experience other than an occasional 20 rounds through some that buddy's own as I shoot at milk jugs and paper targets.
     

    Slackdaddy

    My pronouns: Iva/Bigun
    Jan 1, 2019
    6,152
    That’s why it’s called “sports” not hunt for food.

    I’m sure there are someone out there doesn’t mind bring home extra meat for their family.
    As a life long hunter,,, this thread is sounding a "Little OFF"
    I garden because I enjoy growing and providing my own food, I raise chicken because I enjoy raising my own food. I do not "Enjoy" the actual killing part of hunting. But I DO enjoy the entire process of hunting. I scout, I practice off season with a firearm that will dispatch the deer cleanly (20ga Ultra Slug Hunter), I track and recover my game, we quarter, cut/wrap and freeze the meat ourselves,, Then cook and eat deer a few times a week.

    I think what is sounding odd to many is: You want to "Kill a deer" with a marginal weapon,, and have zero desire to eat the deer meat.
    I think if a person wanted someone to just "hand them some meat wrapped in fur,, they would just go to the grocery store.
    I don't think hunters as a whole have a desire to mentor someone who just wants to kill a deer with an AR and has no desire to utilize the meat.
    Just my observations
     

    308Scout

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Mar 27, 2020
    7,069
    Washington County
    I understand. I currently have an ar15 and I believe if I’m reading Maryland law correct 556 with more then 60grain is allowed with certain casing.

    I mentioned ar15 because my wife won’t let me get another rifle.

    1) So is there anyway way I can make my ar15 legal for white deer hunting?

    2) I don’t eat deer meet so whatever I killed can be given to the person. Who lets me tag along. I am new at this so I doubt I’ll get any on my first trip

    3) thanks to people on here I understand I will need to take hunter license course

    4) I’m sure the infield safety course will be very similar in terms of safety for ccw that’s why they allow us to be exempted and I believe many of the safety rules are the same (don’t point your gun at others, safety on until ready to fire, have your rifle pointed down, keep your mag unloaded until you’re in position, I’ll keep my rifle in bag until situated.)

    That’s why it’s called “sports” not hunt for food.

    I’m sure there are someone out there doesn’t mind bring home extra meat for their family.
    Are you actually looking to learn how to hunt? Preparation, woodsmanship, tracking, judging/taking an ethical shot, dragging, field dressing, processing and many other skills are all parts of hunting. Or are you simply looking to tag along to just shoot an animal for the sake of shooting an animal? If the latter, you'll likely be waiting a long while as no hunter that I know of (myself included) is going to extend an offer to tag along. You'd have better luck just paying an outfitter for a canned hunt if that's all that you're looking for.
     
    Last edited:

    miles71

    Ultimate Member
    Industry Partner
    Jul 19, 2009
    2,642
    Belcamp, Md.
    My son and I will be hunting for the first time this year. He will be hunting before me on the junior hunt weekend. A friend who is experienced will be taking us to his site and show us the ropes. I totally expect my son and I to do the work, participate to the fullest, and
    learn from beginning to end. Even bought a new rifle appropriate for deer.

    I am hoping we can do well enough to be invited back during the normal season so my 13 year old son can teach me how it's done.

    TD
     

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