TRACT Optics

Gearing up for 2023 Modern American Rimfire Series

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  • Czguy

    Junior Member
    Jul 12, 2022
    39
    Maryland
    Just switched from a tricked out CZ457 to a Vudoo 360. The Cz is a fantastic rifle, but I still felt like I was giving up points at distances beyond 200 yards. As a active Modern American Rimfire Series (MARS) competitor and match director, I want every advantage possible. It was after weeks of deliberation that I finally decided to choose a Vudoo for my match rifle for the 2023 season. Spending hard earned money and diving head first deeper into the rabbit hole. I ruled out RimX, Curtis Valor, and further attempts to squeeze more accuracy out of the CZ. All I can say is WOW!! I made the right decision. Even if I did have to eat a lot of crow. T.G. you were right

    I picked up the rifle last Friday. Slapped a Vortex Strike Eagle on it that night and headed off to a tactical bench rest match in New Jersey Saturday morning. Got a quick zero, ran two 10 shot strings over my magnetospeed, and hoped for the best. First shock, was when the magnetospeed read 1.5 for the standard deviation. I thought this has to be a mistake. Nope, second string standard deviation 2.1. Configured Strelok and to the first stage I went. Astonishment is the only way to explain what happened throughout the course of the match. My confidence continued to grow as difficult targets were hit with ease. Quarter inch at 85 yards, IMPACT. Nine out of ten at 226 yards in the wind, IMPACT..... Hitting a playing card on edge 4 out of 4 and cutting it 3 times. The accuracy of the Vudoo is nothing short of amazing. I finished the match with 91 points out of a possible 113. My best points total yet. Granted, this was off of the bench and not from barricades. We will see how I make out this weekend using it in a Rimfire PRS match. Wish me luck, there will be some really good shooters there.

    If you haven't had the opportunity to shoot Rimfire PRS/ MARS and live in the Mid Atlantic. Please come join us at Bridgeville Rifle and Pistol Club. Matches will be the first Saturday of the month starting in January. Register at www.Practiscore.com.

    Hope to see you there,
     

    Russ D

    Active Member
    Nov 10, 2008
    11,662
    Sykesville
    Good luck! I’ve had a healthy debate with myself about dipping my toes into this competition, but with the kids and college sports my schedule wouldn’t allow it. If or when that changes I’ll give it a go. Without asking you to give up some secret squirrel process, how do you go about lot testing and securing your ammo? Are ammo shortages a real problem? Do you switch brands and lots often?
     

    4g64loser

    collector of fine .22s
    Jan 18, 2007
    3,467
    maryland
    Could I compete with a Ruger American bolt 22 with a 3-9 scope? Not trying to win, just interested in giving it a try.
    Generally you will need something with a bit more magnification. The real thing is the ability to repeatably dial your elevations. Think target type turrets.
     

    Swaim13

    Member
    Jun 11, 2017
    303
    Without asking you to give up some secret squirrel process, how do you go about lot testing and securing your ammo? Are ammo shortages a real problem? Do you switch brands and lots often?
    It's not really secret squirrel, just takes effort and money. For vudoo rifles with a ravage chamber, they are designed to shoot Lapua center x so most people send the rifle to Lapua for testing which then let's you know which lot is best and you can then buy a case. Eley does something similar but I believe they only test tenex. Any one with any 22lr can do this.

    If you are shooting eley or sk, people usually buy a brick or two of multiple lots and just take it out and shoot it. Just make sure you shoot some rounds between lots of different ammo to season the barrel. You really just need to be moa with as few fliers as possible. Using a chronograph can tell you which has the lower sd which you want when you go farther.
     

    KRC

    Member
    Sep 30, 2018
    510
    Cecil County MD
    Could I compete with a Ruger American bolt 22 with a 3-9 scope? Not trying to win, just interested in giving it a try.
    YES! Find a match near you. Show up with what you have. It (probably!) won't win, or even work well on anything but a trial term basis, but you'll get to see what the sport is about, learn about equipment NEEDS (Sorry Tim - I don't believe: "most" people send their rifles to Lapua for testing - we can take a survey) and meet some shooters who will talk your ears off about rifles, scopes and other ancillary gear, as well as help you out with your "dope". And you'll likely have a lot of fun.

    On even a trial basis, 4G64's scope concerns are valid. With your existing (SFP?) scope what you will probably have to do before a match is (with the ammo you will use in the match - NO high velocity stuff):
    1) set the magnification of your scope to its highest level (9X) and leave it there (do not even move it down and back up)
    2) dial in your elevation (and windage) knobs for a 50 yard zero and record where this is on your turrents
    3) determine how many clicks (MOA's or MIL's) up or down you need for the following distances: 25, 100, 150, 200 yards - if possible, and more values are better (you are creating data for a ballistics table for your scope/rifle)
    4) if you can, chronograph your ammo muzzle velocities to get an average

    If you wish to continue this type of competition, a FFP scope with magnification up to about 24X would be required. There's a good selection of these scopes available in a variety of price ranges.

    If you show up at a Bridgeville MARS match and let the match director (Czguy) know you are coming beforehand, he will likely be able to have a loaner rifle available for you.
     

    KRC

    Member
    Sep 30, 2018
    510
    Cecil County MD
    Some higher quality ammo brands/types, especially SK brand, can have spotty availability, and you often have to buy when and where you can. Getting follow-up ammo with the same lot #'s is easier with Eley brand (Killough's) than SK, where it's usually you get what they have.

    Different shooters have different type and lot testing methods, but simply shooting groups and comparing is the crux of it. Once shooters have determined a brand, type, lot, and PRICE of ammo that works for them, they usually stick with that for a while (buying multiple bricks) and don't change unless/until they believe they can do better and are willing to pay any increased cost. Price generaly correlates well with quality and consistency.
     

    Swaim13

    Member
    Jun 11, 2017
    303
    (Sorry Tim - I don't believe: "most" people send their rifles to Lapua for testing - we can take a survey)

    I definitely agree that most people who aren't shooting a bunch of ammo I'm a year need to send their rifles to Lapua or Eley for testing! I meant most people shooting vudoos send them to Lapua as that is what the rifle was designed for. Sorry for the ambiguity!

    This was more in response to asking how people are doing lot testing for their rifles. If you want help and are in the central Maryland, give me a private message and I'll come help. I have a chronograph too if you want.

    I also agree that just come and shoot what you have. If you don't think what you have will work, message the match director and they typically have an extra rifle or two for people to try. If I am at a match, I don't mind people using my rifle as well.

    I typically shoot between 8 and 15 power. Having more zoom isn't better always.
     

    Russ D

    Active Member
    Nov 10, 2008
    11,662
    Sykesville
    It's not really secret squirrel, just takes effort and money. For vudoo rifles with a ravage chamber, they are designed to shoot Lapua center x so most people send the rifle to Lapua for testing which then let's you know which lot is best and you can then buy a case. Eley does something similar but I believe they only test tenex. Any one with any 22lr can do this.

    If you are shooting eley or sk, people usually buy a brick or two of multiple lots and just take it out and shoot it. Just make sure you shoot some rounds between lots of different ammo to season the barrel. You really just need to be moa with as few fliers as possible. Using a chronograph can tell you which has the lower sd which you want when you go farther.
    Thank you for the answer, it echos what 4g64loser has told me. I assume you mean the guys at the top shooting Voodoos and in contention are sending their rifles out for testing. I get the why around this, but isn’t this “bad” for the sport? It certainly has to be limiting growth.
     

    Tebonski

    Member
    Jan 23, 2013
    506
    Harford County
    Any truth that guys using $2,500.00 or more worth of rifle, scope, mounts, rings, throw levers, scope levels, bags, ammo, kneepads, bipods compete in their own, exclusive category?
     

    Swaim13

    Member
    Jun 11, 2017
    303
    So being frank, the easy button for a vudoo is to send it in as they do testing on 4 to 10 lots of ammo at different levels. This is not for everyone as there are headaches to mailing a rifle.

    Typically, the more expensive the ammo, the more consistent it is. That doesn't mean it will shoot better in your rifle. The issue with rimfire is that different lots of the same ammo in a rifle will shoot differently. You really need to be able to shoot MOA consistently to 50 yards to be competitive, but that is fairly easy to do with current rifles.

    The #1 and 2 shooters in MARS this year weren't shooting vudoos and didn't send their rifles in for testing. They don't win bc of their ammo. They win bc they have great skills at building solid positions and great shooting skills.
     

    Swaim13

    Member
    Jun 11, 2017
    303
    Any truth that guys using $2,500.00 or more worth of rifle, scope, mounts, rings, throw levers, scope levels, bags, ammo, kneepads, bipods compete in their own, exclusive category?
    Some series have a base class. Others don't.

    The really good shooters will beat you with cheap or expensive gear. It's really about can you find the correct target, build a solid position quickly, and have solid fundamentals.
     

    KRC

    Member
    Sep 30, 2018
    510
    Cecil County MD
    $2500 is not what the top guys are spending. Some scopes alone are more expensive than that, never mind the rifles, accessories and ammo. (One shooter at last years finale had an $8k rifle and $4k scope - he finished mid-pack) You do NOT have to spend that kind of money to 1) be competitive, 2) have a lot of fun, and 3) learn how to shoot a rifle (ballistics and positioning etc.).
     

    Swaim13

    Member
    Jun 11, 2017
    303
    Agreed with KRC. It's better to come out, learn, have fun, and get experience. Don't compete against anyone but yourself.

    I started with a 500 dollar rifle, 250 scope, a 25 dollar app (strelok pro), and a Harris bipod. As you shoot, you can borrow gear, try different things, and eventually tinker to build what works for you and what you like.
     

    Broncolou

    Member
    Jan 22, 2013
    687
    Parkton MD
    You just need 1 moa(ish) ammo to come find out the myriad of other things you dont know about the game. Solid dope with good temp tables is pretty important too.. Spring/fall temp swings are pretty tough on these little cases and 1ish grain of powder. I run the matches at York IWLA and have learned a lot over the past few years playing this game. It's super fun and addictive.
     

    Czguy

    Junior Member
    Jul 12, 2022
    39
    Maryland
    Good luck! I’ve had a healthy debate with myself about dipping my toes into this competition, but with the kids and college sports my schedule wouldn’t allow it. If or when that changes I’ll give it a go. Without asking you to give up some secret squirrel process, how do you go about lot testing and securing your ammo? Are ammo shortages a real problem? Do you switch brands and lots often?
    I do, many don't. It depends on what you consider an acceptable level of accuracy and how competitive you want to be.
     

    Czguy

    Junior Member
    Jul 12, 2022
    39
    Maryland
    I do, many don't. It depends on what you consider an acceptable level of accuracy and how competitive you want to be.
    Yes, I do switch brands of supplies are short. Normally I will buy a few different lots of whatever I can get a hold of, test it and buy what works best
     

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