A relative wants to sell handguns for her dead spouse

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  • efeng9622

    Active Member
    Oct 10, 2017
    185
    Gaithersburg, MD
    She want to directly sell two handguns to a Maryland or Virginia dealer , not private sell, also she don't want to apply a HQL to switch the title to own these guns, the title are still under her husband name. I remember I sold two handguns on Virginia gun shows since I moved to Maryland, but I only was asked to provide the DL and no one ask about if I am the owner or not, but I never sold other person's gun, so I have no experience to answer the above question.
    Thanks.
     

    Growler215

    Ultimate Member
    Dec 30, 2020
    2,333
    SOMD
    10 second Google search:


    "Correct, inherited firearms are exempt from the HQL requirement. All she has to do is go to the barracks and fill out the paperwork. There is no fee for inheritance transfers."

    Has this changed?
     

    Tapper

    Member
    MDS Supporter
    Feb 16, 2024
    48
    Pasadena
    If she’s the executor/PR for the estate, I wouldn’t think she’d have any issue selling to a licensed dealer. Also, I wouldn’t think she’d have to transfer to her name to then sell.

    (Unsure of the previous history as I’m new here)
     

    BurkeM

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 8, 2014
    1,630
    Baltimore
    She want to directly sell two handguns to a Maryland or Virginia dealer , not private sell, also she don't want to apply a HQL to switch the title to own these guns, the title are still under her husband name.
    Handguns are not 'titled,' she can sell directly to any FFL without any issues.

    No HQL is needed to SELL.
     

    hillbilly grandpa

    Active Member
    Jan 26, 2013
    973
    Arnold
    I had a similar question brought to me just last week. A call to Pikesville produced the following directives.
    1. The widow needs to effect a transfer by inheritance into her name. No HQL required.
    2. Widow can then sell/transfer the regulated firearm to whomever she chooses--a secondary transfer. If to a private individual that person will need in HQL.
    3. In this case, since multiple regulated firearms are involved, the trooper advised waiting until the Designated Collector letter arrives, then meet at the barracks, transfer all under one 77R, wait the seven days, then complete the transfer. Trooper advised not to make it more complicated than it needed to be.

    (Parenthetically, the civilian employee I spoke with initially opined that the process was very complex and since the widow is physically unable to complete an HQL process, which was represented as mandatory, the alternative would be to surrender the firearms to MSP. One of the downsides of expanded non-sworn employees made necessary by the volume of new W&C applicants is that callers often deal with people who are ill-informed and under-trained. I've had this experience on several occasions. I've had to endure these conversations, then raise substantive questions, before a request to speak to a trooper is complied with.)
     
    If she’s the executor/PR for the estate, I wouldn’t think she’d have any issue selling to a licensed dealer. Also, I wouldn’t think she’d have to transfer to her name to then sell.

    (Unsure of the previous history as I’m new here)
    This is how we handled them when I worked for an FFL. Her identification and his death certificate were enough to suffice our record keeping. (Yes, we kept copies of both in our files)
    I had a similar question brought to me just last week. A call to Pikesville produced the following directives.
    1. The widow needs to effect a transfer by inheritance into her name. No HQL required.
    2. Widow can then sell/transfer the regulated firearm to whomever she chooses--a secondary transfer. If to a private individual that person will need in HQL.
    3. In this case, since multiple regulated firearms are involved, the trooper advised waiting until the Designated Collector letter arrives, then meet at the barracks, transfer all under one 77R, wait the seven days, then complete the transfer. Trooper advised not to make it more complicated than it needed to be.

    (Parenthetically, the civilian employee I spoke with initially opined that the process was very complex and since the widow is physically unable to complete an HQL process, which was represented as mandatory, the alternative would be to surrender the firearms to MSP. One of the downsides of expanded non-sworn employees made necessary by the volume of new W&C applicants is that callers often deal with people who are ill-informed and under-trained. I've had this experience on several occasions. I've had to endure these conversations, then raise substantive questions, before a request to speak to a trooper is complied with.)
    I have never heard of this process when disposing of a deceased's firearms to a licensed FFL. To a private person, it might actually be that complicated.
     

    Tapper

    Member
    MDS Supporter
    Feb 16, 2024
    48
    Pasadena
    I had a similar question brought to me just last week. A call to Pikesville produced the following directives.
    1. The widow needs to effect a transfer by inheritance into her name. No HQL required.
    2. Widow can then sell/transfer the regulated firearm to whomever she chooses--a secondary transfer. If to a private individual that person will need in HQL.
    3. In this case, since multiple regulated firearms are involved, the trooper advised waiting until the Designated Collector letter arrives, then meet at the barracks, transfer all under one 77R, wait the seven days, then complete the transfer. Trooper advised not to make it more complicated than it needed to be.

    (Parenthetically, the civilian employee I spoke with initially opined that the process was very complex and since the widow is physically unable to complete an HQL process, which was represented as mandatory, the alternative would be to surrender the firearms to MSP. One of the downsides of expanded non-sworn employees made necessary by the volume of new W&C applicants is that callers often deal with people who are ill-informed and under-trained. I've had this experience on several occasions. I've had to endure these conversations, then raise substantive questions, before a request to speak to a trooper is complied with.)
    I’m sorry, but that just doesn’t sound accurate. Also, I don’t have very much faith in MSP to know the law either (even though they’re tasked with enforcing it). I know of a situation similar to above and the PR was asked if their name was on the Death certificate. SMH
     

    efeng9622

    Active Member
    Oct 10, 2017
    185
    Gaithersburg, MD
    What is your question, OP.

    You haven't asked a question
    10 second Google search:


    "Correct, inherited firearms are exempt from the HQL requirement. All she has to do is go to the barracks and fill out the paperwork. There is no fee for inheritance transfers."

    Has this changed?
    My question now is if she can inherit there guns without HQL requirement , she may hasn't to sell guns and just go to barracks to finish the paperwork, that's easy way. Applying the HQL need spend around $250 and take 4 hours class. but , has this rule changed?
     
    Last edited:

    Biggfoot44

    Ultimate Member
    Aug 2, 2009
    33,108
    Is there someone other than the Widow who is Personal Representative of the Estate instead ?
     

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