ZeroWater Products

The #1 community for Gun Owners of the Northeast

Member Benefits:

  • No ad networks!
  • Discuss all aspects of firearm ownership
  • Discuss anti-gun legislation
  • Buy, sell, and trade in the classified section
  • Chat with Local gun shops, ranges, trainers & other businesses
  • Discover free outdoor shooting areas
  • View up to date on firearm-related events
  • Share photos & video with other members
  • ...and so much more!
  • Do You Use ZeroWater Products?

    • Yes

    • No

    • I use shitty Brita products


    Results are only viewable after voting.

    Chat-Bot

    Disinformation Governor
    Oct 17, 2020
    4,867
    под скалой
    Been using them for years and really like their filters because it removes the awful chlorine smell and taste from MD water and actually tastes good.

    Cracked open a new case of filters and noticed they're a bit squishy where the other ones have been more solid. Guess they're thinning out the plastic casing to shave off some pennies, charge more, and say they're helping the environment. Has anyone noticed this?
     
    I have never used Zero Water products, so I can't speak for them. If chlorine is your concern, you can save a ton of money by installing a simple carbon block filter for your drinking water, I change my cartridge about once a year for ~$10 and five minutes of my time.
    .
    WD-10UB-5_700x700.png
     

    Afrikeber

    Ultimate Member
    Jan 14, 2013
    6,952
    Urbana, Md.
    I have never used Zero Water products, so I can't speak for them. If chlorine is your concern, you can save a ton of money by installing a simple carbon block filter for your drinking water, I change my cartridge about once a year for ~$10 and five minutes of my time.
    .
    WD-10UB-5_700x700.png
    So looks like for this application I would have to divert the cold water supply going to the faucet through the filter looks simple enough. Don’t see isolation valves to service the filter unles there is a shutoff at the filter itself I don’t have the access hole for that additional water fixture and not trying to core out the quartz counter. Otherwise this definitely looks like a cost effective way to save versus buying my zero water filters.

    Where is everyone getting their zero water filters from? Saw them at Target before but not anymore?
     

    K31

    "Part of that Ultra MAGA Crowd"
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 15, 2006
    35,859
    AA county
    I haven't noticed the cartridges being more "squishy" but the latest one I installed seems to be slow to filter. That happened with the original ones and made me poke some holes in the screen at the top. I haven't done that so far with this one.
     

    K31

    "Part of that Ultra MAGA Crowd"
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 15, 2006
    35,859
    AA county
    Had this in our house. Along with a Brita. Zero Water removes EVERYTHING from your water and makes it like drinking distilled water. Takes away even the beneficial minerals

    They claim to remove all dissolved solids and the two tests I've seen of them tend to back that up and make them the best pitcher type of water filter out there. I don't think they make any claims however about removing pathogens or chemicals that don't fit into the "dissolved solids" category. So no, not exactly like distilled water.
     

    FeelTheNoise

    WTF
    MDS Supporter
    Mar 11, 2015
    34
    Cecil County
    Maybe a stupid question here, is this mainly to remove the taste from town water treatments or are folks installing these for well water as well? We're on a well (with a water softener) that has always tasted fine to me, although I suppose the proper filter would also protect us from contaminants if anything ever made it into the groundwater nearby.
     

    Chat-Bot

    Disinformation Governor
    Oct 17, 2020
    4,867
    под скалой
    They claim to remove all dissolved solids and the two tests I've seen of them tend to back that up and make them the best pitcher type of water filter out there. I don't think they make any claims however about removing pathogens or chemicals that don't fit into the "dissolved solids" category. So no, not exactly like distilled water.
    Correct, it's a filter for potable water and should not be used with untreated water.

    So looks like for this application I would have to divert the cold water supply going to the faucet through the filter looks simple enough. Don’t see isolation valves to service the filter unles there is a shutoff at the filter itself I don’t have the access hole for that additional water fixture and not trying to core out the quartz counter. Otherwise this definitely looks like a cost effective way to save versus buying my zero water filters.

    Where is everyone getting their zero water filters from? Saw them at Target before but not anymore?

    Used to use Bed Bath & Beyond coupons on some packs which would be the cheapest at times. They're gone now. Amazon depending on which quantity pack you get.
     

    K31

    "Part of that Ultra MAGA Crowd"
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 15, 2006
    35,859
    AA county
    Maybe a stupid question here, is this mainly to remove the taste from town water treatments or are folks installing these for well water as well? We're on a well (with a water softener) that has always tasted fine to me, although I suppose the proper filter would also protect us from contaminants if anything ever made it into the groundwater nearby.
    Zero Water is not an installed filter. It is a pitcher type filter (with larger ones meant to sit on a shelf with a spigot). They reduce/remove total dissolved solids (the claim is that they remove 100% of those but as the filter gets older it removes less. I think they say to replace it at 25 or something based on the provided meter). People use them who are worried about lead, iron, calcium, etc.

    This is the Project Farm comparison of filters although he mixes in things for other purposes like Life Straw which is for removing pathogens and inline filters so it's not totally apples to apples.

     
    Last edited:

    FeelTheNoise

    WTF
    MDS Supporter
    Mar 11, 2015
    34
    Cecil County
    Zero Water is not an installed filter. It is a pitcher type filter (with larger ones meant to sit on a shelf with a spigot). They reduce/remove total dissolved solids (the claim is that they remove 100% of those but as the filter gets older it removes less. I think they say to replace it at 25 or something based on the provided meter). People use them who are worried about lead, iron, calcium, etc.

    This is the Project Farm comparison of filters although he mixes in things for other purposes like Life Straw which is for removing pathogens and inline filters so it's not totally apples to apples.


    Ah okay, thank you. I had misunderstood, I thought this was referring to something installed below a faucet or possibly on a whole house system. We have used Brita in the past for drinking water at home but haven't tried Zero Water before. For backpacking I have been using the Sawyer Mini or Squeeze.
     

    Mark75H

    MD Wear&Carry Instructor
    Industry Partner
    MDS Supporter
    Sep 25, 2011
    17,600
    Outside the Gates
    Well water, triple filtered from a separate tap with filters under the sink, then Zero'ed to be certain. The water I drink is water.
     

    hobiecat590

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Feb 2, 2016
    2,606
    I used a new meter and tested Brita, Zero water, and my Samsung filtered water as an experiment starting with 178 pure unfiltered well house water with a high calcium content.

    The Britta was over 100.
    The fridge was 176 with a brand new filter after a 5 gallon break in.
    The Zero water, tested 0 which is great until you add 176 ice from the fridge.

    I'd like to install a zero water type under counter system to feed the fridge and kitchen sink but have not found one in the same class as the zero water. Any advice would be welcome.
     
    I used a new meter and tested Brita, Zero water, and my Samsung filtered water as an experiment starting with 178 pure unfiltered well house water with a high calcium content.

    The Britta was over 100.
    The fridge was 176 with a brand new filter after a 5 gallon break in.
    The Zero water, tested 0 which is great until you add 176 ice from the fridge.

    I'd like to install a zero water type under counter system to feed the fridge and kitchen sink but have not found one in the same class as the zero water. Any advice would be welcome.
    That is a reverse osmosis system.
    I would be willing to bet the Zero Water system is simply a vessel filled with cation and anion resin beads. It would explain the zero TDS and very short life of the filters.
     

    K31

    "Part of that Ultra MAGA Crowd"
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 15, 2006
    35,859
    AA county
    Ah okay, thank you. I had misunderstood, I thought this was referring to something installed below a faucet or possibly on a whole house system. We have used Brita in the past for drinking water at home but haven't tried Zero Water before. For backpacking I have been using the Sawyer Mini or Squeeze.
    Brita has a lawsuit against them for allegedly not filtering what they claim to.
     
    Zero Water is not an installed filter. It is a pitcher type filter (with larger ones meant to sit on a shelf with a spigot). They reduce/remove total dissolved solids (the claim is that they remove 100% of those but as the filter gets older it removes less. I think they say to replace it at 25 or something based on the provided meter). People use them who are worried about lead, iron, calcium, etc.

    This is the Project Farm comparison of filters although he mixes in things for other purposes like Life Straw which is for removing pathogens and inline filters so it's not totally apples to apples.



    That is a reverse osmosis system.
    I would be willing to bet the Zero Water system is simply a vessel filled with cation and anion resin beads. It would explain the zero TDS and very short life of the filters.
    13:10 he cut open the Zero Water filter.
    .
    5691a5e1d316da2178fbef2ca412f23e2a9d3ea0544f58abfe74432793c8cd64.jpg
     

    Mark75H

    MD Wear&Carry Instructor
    Industry Partner
    MDS Supporter
    Sep 25, 2011
    17,600
    Outside the Gates
    That is a reverse osmosis system.
    I would be willing to bet the Zero Water system is simply a vessel filled with cation and anion resin beads. It would explain the zero TDS and very short life of the filters.
    We use the zero every day and it lasts more than six months between cartridge changes. Sometimes close to a year before the reading comes up between 50 and 100.
     

    hobiecat590

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Feb 2, 2016
    2,606
    That is a reverse osmosis system.
    I would be willing to bet the Zero Water system is simply a vessel filled with cation and anion resin beads. It would explain the zero TDS and very short life of the filters.
    Wow, I never considered that gravity and air pressure was enough to make a reverse osmosis system work in a cartridge. I always assumed they had better carbon filtration than the other guys. Do you recommend going full RO for the kitchen/fridge for untreated well water? Thanks in advance.
     
    We use the zero every day and it lasts more than six months between cartridge changes. Sometimes close to a year before the reading comes up between 50 and 100.
    When Project Farm cut open the Zero Water filter, it was very obvious it was nothing more than a mixed bed deionization bead filter- cation and anion.
    The whole ZERO aspect ends after filtering 20-30 gallons of water with >200mg/l TDS.
     

    Users who are viewing this thread

    Latest posts

    Forum statistics

    Threads
    277,321
    Messages
    7,366,317
    Members
    33,778
    Latest member
    chilidog

    Latest threads

    Top Bottom