The pig report. What Role Do Hunters Play in the Fight Against Feral Swine?

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  • woodline

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 8, 2017
    1,891
    Sounds like fear mongering. You can eat pretty much anything with fur.
    For everything except preparations relying on a lot of intramuscular fat, feral pig is usually more flavorful and has a nicer texture. Whether or not it is GOOD flavor depends on what it’s been eating, but there will certainly be a lot more of it.
     

    teratos

    My hair is amazing
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 22, 2009
    46,989
    Bel Air
    For everything except preparations relying on a lot of intramuscular fat, feral pig is usually more flavorful and has a nicer texture. Whether or not it is GOOD flavor depends on what it’s been eating, but there will certainly be a lot more of it.
    Sausage is always an option. I think BrowningGuy and I are going to play with a pork coyote sausage. Just for doodies and chuckles.
     

    woodline

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 8, 2017
    1,891
    Sausage is always an option. I think BrowningGuy and I are going to play with a pork coyote sausage. Just for doodies and chuckles.
    Bold choice. Pork fat and heavy seasoning can make almost anything palatable, though.
     

    teratos

    My hair is amazing
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 22, 2009
    46,989
    Bel Air
    Bold choice. Pork fat and heavy seasoning can make almost anything palatable, though.
    We kill them. May as well figure out a way to utilize the protein. I’m not a giant fan of killing and leaving. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not sad about shooting a coyote. It cycles back…

    He got me some beaver, which is very good. Beaver-coyote sausage could be a thing. Not gonna waste good beaver messing with it, pork first.
     

    woodline

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 8, 2017
    1,891
    We kill them. May as well figure out a way to utilize the protein. I’m not a giant fan of killing and leaving. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not sad about shooting a coyote. It cycles back…

    He got me some beaver, which is very good. Beaver-coyote sausage could be a thing. Not gonna waste good beaver messing with it, pork first.
    For sure, now that I don’t travel half half the year I’m hoping to shrink my family’s animal protein consumption to what I hunt and buy from a local farm.

    I wouldn’t feel too bad about killing coyotes if they are threatening local livestock (and turn out to be inedible even as sausage). There’s plenty of scavengers out there that will thank you. Good on you for giving it a try regardless of how it turns out.

    Steve Rinella says beaver is delicious. Apparently at one point the Catholic Church ruled that it is a fish so that it could be consumed during days when adherents were required to abstain from meat.
     

    teratos

    My hair is amazing
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 22, 2009
    46,989
    Bel Air
    Steve Rinella says beaver is delicious. Apparently at one point the Catholic Church ruled that it is a fish so that it could be consumed during days when adherents were required to abstain from meat.
    Interesting tidbit of Catholic history. Beaver is a rich red color, and tastes like a sweet pot roast. In terms of game, and I prefer game to store bought meat, I really enjoy (top 5) squirrel, beaver, dove, raccoon, pheasant. In that order. Lol.
     

    Batt816

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Dec 1, 2018
    3,306
    Eastern Shore
    Interesting tidbit of Catholic history. Beaver is a rich red color, and tastes like a sweet pot roast. In terms of game, and I prefer game to store bought meat, I really enjoy (top 5) squirrel, beaver, dove, raccoon, pheasant. In that order. Lol.
    How do you cook squirrel, and how many does it take for a meal? I have a ton of them in my woods, always steeling deer corn. I’ve often thought about thinning them out.
     

    teratos

    My hair is amazing
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 22, 2009
    46,989
    Bel Air
    How do you cook squirrel, and how many does it take for a meal? I have a ton of them in my woods, always steeling deer corn. I’ve often thought about thinning them out.
    Squirrels are a bitch to skin. They have very little fat. Squirrels also eat primarily nuts, and their meat is rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, so while low fat, the fat in squirrel is beneficial. We do one of a couple of things. Brunswick Stew, which in its original form should be made with squirrel. Squirrel pot pie, a family favorite, or if they skin nicely, BBQ squirrel. Cook like chicken on the grill.

     

    Batt816

    Active Member
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    Dec 1, 2018
    3,306
    Eastern Shore
    Squirrels are a bitch to skin. They have very little fat. Squirrels also eat primarily nuts, and their meat is rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, so while low fat, the fat in squirrel is beneficial. We do one of a couple of things. Brunswick Stew, which in its original form should be made with squirrel. Squirrel pot pie, a family favorite, or if they skin nicely, BBQ squirrel. Cook like chicken on the grill.

    interesting. I wonder if the air nozzle trick would work on a squirrel. It does great with deer, it separates the meat from the skin. Plus it’s fun watching a deer turn into a balloon :)
     

    teratos

    My hair is amazing
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 22, 2009
    46,989
    Bel Air
    interesting. I wonder if the air nozzle trick would work on a squirrel. It does great with deer, it separates the meat from the skin. Plus it’s fun watching a deer turn into a balloon :)
    Lol. I’m allergic to deer fur (not even kidding) so I must Google this trick.
     

    Batt816

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Dec 1, 2018
    3,306
    Eastern Shore
    Lol. I’m allergic to deer fur (not even kidding) so I must Google this trick.
    It works great. Over the past 5 years or so, my hands tend to cramp up while pulling on the deer hide. I saw the air nozzle trick on YouTube and it’s a big help. I have also done the golf ball trick (also on YouTube) too, but that won’t work with squirrels.
     

    RRomig

    Member
    Industry Partner
    MDS Supporter
    Aug 30, 2021
    634
    Burtonsville MD
    Sitting here in NC waiting for the field to come alive. Saw a small group last night at dusk but the field is 1200 x 500 yards and couldn’t get to them in time. Working old school this weekend with a green light. That’s a whole other story
     

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    remrug

    Active Member
    Mar 13, 2009
    1,178
    manchester md
    Squirrels are a bitch to skin. They have very little fat. Squirrels also eat primarily nuts, and their meat is rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, so while low fat, the fat in squirrel is beneficial. We do one of a couple of things. Brunswick Stew, which in its original form should be made with squirrel. Squirrel pot pie, a family favorite, or if they skin nicely, BBQ squirrel. Cook like chicken on the grill.

    If you cut across the back to skin,it is a real bitch to clean.Hair winds up all over the meat.
    If you do the cut through the tail method,its not hard at all and the hair isnt much of a problem.
     

    teratos

    My hair is amazing
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 22, 2009
    46,989
    Bel Air
    If you cut across the back to skin,it is a real bitch to clean.Hair winds up all over the meat.
    If you do the cut through the tail method,its not hard at all and the hair isnt much of a problem.
    Oh, I must learn this.
     

    WeldonHunter

    Member
    Apr 27, 2011
    127
    Louisiana
    I'm in north central Louisiana now and it's basically open season on feral hogs here. I have a 180 acre spread behind me that used to be the pastures for the house I own that was part of a dairy. We have them come through here from time to time. My neighbors cut the fields for hay and the hogs ruin large sections of the fields making them almost impossible the mow and bale. They put a corral trap out with a live feed game cam but once the trap went up they left. We also have a place 3 miles up the road that's 20 acres and they rooted up about an acre there last fall. This would be a different sounder. People here hunt them but I doubt they're putting much of a dent in them. They bred like rats. Friends of ours have a daughter that hunts them with her boyfriend and some other friends only using dogs and fixed blade knives. We used to raise hogs here and at my mom's place and we started with 6 and over the next few years we had as many as 25 and I was killing 5 to 8 at a time with the 44Mag. Mom called me told me a sow with a litter dug out and I told my mother it was time to butcher them all. One picture is the damage the ferals did behind my house and the other is the ones up caught on my neighbor's game cam. If I ever see any they won't last. I have a lifetime hunting license so I'm good to go for life.
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