Spinning or casting rod?

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  • Joseph

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Oct 13, 2009
    2,333
    Clinton MD
    I plan on getting back into fishing this year and I have been researching the various equipment available. My previous and rather limited experience has been fishing streams and ponds with light/medium spinning rods & reels. Now that we have a house in Lewes DE I bought a fishing kayak and will start out fishing in the tidal creeks around the Lewes inlet, inshore in the DE bay and in the vicinity of the Cape Henlopen fishing pier. My target fish will be striped bass, flounder and anything else that is good eating.
    My question is if there is any advantage in spinning VS casting rods&reels when fishing from a kayak for these types of fish. For the time being I plan on using artificial lures instead of live or cut bait. I already have a 7’ medium spinning rod and a 6’6” medium/heavy spinning rod. I will probably end up with another rod or two in the future and was wondering if there is any benefit to trying out a casting setup? I have not seen a clear cut case for one over the other in anything I have read yet.
     

    Kman

    Peace is underrated
    Dec 23, 2010
    10,579
    Eastern shore
    The only situations I use baitcasters is pitching weighty lures in relatively open water and wanting heavy drag and more power reeling.
     

    outrider58

    Pronouns: It, That
    MDS Supporter
    Jul 29, 2014
    37,492
    If you are going to carry more than one rod in your kayak, there's a good chance those extra rods will be in rod holders behind you. Casting a bait caster will require you to cast over head(as opposed to underhand pitching and such). There will be a reasonable chance of hitting one of your other rods on your back cast. Do that with spinning gear, no big deal. Do that with a bait caster and major bird's nest. I prefer bait casters over spinning gear(except when it comes the ultra-light), but not out of a kayak. And I have done it from a kayak. It's not the best place to learn to use a bait caster if you aren't already good with one.

    My 2 cents
     

    eightshot627

    Member
    Apr 10, 2008
    233
    Thurmont
    Like everything that has been said. Throwing heavier lures a casting rod it the way to go. The control you have riding your thumb on the spool is unmatched. It comes with a price of the backlash. A birds nest of unparalleled tangle that is unforgiving on the water. A spinning rod is more versatile and forgiving. A well mastered casting rod is hard to beat. I broke a window 30yds behind me the first time I tried a casting reel. A good fried taught me to use it correctly and it is a awesome skill that i love and it is a skill. Both have their place.

    Good luck!
    Walt
     

    Joseph

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Oct 13, 2009
    2,333
    Clinton MD
    Thanks for the input. I had not considered the ergonomics of casting from the kayak and the potential for obstructions behind me creating a problem.
     

    John from MD

    American Patriot
    MDS Supporter
    May 12, 2005
    16,314
    Socialist State of Maryland
    I have fished from a Kayak for about 20 years now. I use both types of reels on my equipment. If you are targeting big fish, a short stout rod with a bait caster works better than a spinning reel as you have much more control of the fish and can do it mostly with one hand.

    I use light spinning reels when targeting perch and croaker sized fish and when I want to throw spinning lures. I don't have to worry about bird's nest when casting a spinning reel.

    Just my .02 cents.
     

    outrider58

    Pronouns: It, That
    MDS Supporter
    Jul 29, 2014
    37,492
    fishing.jpg

    Not saying it's impossible, but it's not for beginners. This was us in Blackwater, snakehead fishing. I threw a buzbait most of the time with a baitcaster.
     

    KingClown

    SOmething Witty
    Jul 29, 2020
    475
    Deep Blue MD
    You dont have to cast a bait caster over head. You can cast side arm and weightless lures. Its mostly what I use. But you have to be good with them or you will have many birds nests.
    If you really want one go with the Shimano SLX DC or Curado DC. Its actually very hard to back lash them. The DC is for Digital Chip. No batteries and completely water proof. The power for hte chip is generated when you cast. I use them to teach kids how to cast them that want to use stuff like the pro's. Its nice to see them happy.
    With that said you will need practice before I would take one on a Kyak. IMHO you can do much much more with a casting set up but a spinning is much much easier to use.
     

    Joseph

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Oct 13, 2009
    2,333
    Clinton MD
    I guess what I am having trouble understanding is for the same size and strength fishing rod how does the casting vs spinning mechanism make a difference? If for example I was wanting to use a 1/2 - 3/4oz jig head with soft plastics trying to catch striped bass.
     

    remrug

    Active Member
    Mar 13, 2009
    1,178
    manchester md
    I never learned to use a baitcaster,so I wont comment on that. My advice is ,dont go cheap on anything including the line you use. I love the instant hook up with Fireline. I just used the Chrystal for the first time casting a spinner for trout. I really like it so far. A palomar knot is required but an easy knot to learn
     

    gtodave

    Member
    MDS Supporter
    Aug 14, 2007
    10,936
    Mt Airy
    I guess what I am having trouble understanding is for the same size and strength fishing rod how does the casting vs spinning mechanism make a difference? If for example I was wanting to use a 1/2 - 3/4oz jig head with soft plastics trying to catch striped bass.
    There really isn't a strength difference between spinning and casting reels. Theoretically you can clamp down the drag on a baitcaster more, but in reality I don't think that's true any more. In either case, your line is going to be more of a restriction than the reel will be.

    Solution: buy one of each and see what you like!

    Seriously, you're going to want at least two rods out on a kayak, because the last thing you want is to paddle all the way to a good spot and have your one rod combo break down on you. You'll need a backup. Might as well have a variety. That way you'll learn which you like better for each type of fishing.

    ETA: Outrider makes a good point about your back cast and hitting one of the rods in your rod holder. I just put the rod I'm not using in the left hand holder, since I cast right handed. That gives me about 260 degrees of room for casting.
     

    Brickman301

    Active Member
    Mar 23, 2015
    1,739
    FREDERICK, MD
    You dont have to cast a bait caster over head. You can cast side arm and weightless lures. Its mostly what I use. But you have to be good with them or you will have many birds nests.
    If you really want one go with the Shimano SLX DC or Curado DC. Its actually very hard to back lash them. The DC is for Digital Chip. No batteries and completely water proof. The power for hte chip is generated when you cast. I use them to teach kids how to cast them that want to use stuff like the pro's. Its nice to see them happy.
    With that said you will need practice before I would take one on a Kyak. IMHO you can do much much more with a casting set up but a spinning is much much easier to use.
    This! When it comes to bait casting reels, you really do get what you pay for. The quoted reels above are awesome for beginners, and the pro’s even use them.
    My son uses the Curado DC, almost exclusively when bass fishing. He can cast it just about anyway imaginable, overhead, side casting, flipping, etc. there is a longer learning curve with bait casters.

    Nowadays, I fish mostly freshwater, and use spinning reels for everything, unless I’m fishing for big catfish. Then I use conventional reels. I don’t fish tournaments, just for fun, and the occasional meal. I mostly use ultralight or tiny lite spinning rods and reels for just about anything. I buy the cheap ones. When bass fishing I use heavier line than they call for. The little rods and reels don’t last long( maybe a year or 2)
    To me, it’s worth it as the fight is that much more enjoyable.
     

    Joseph

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Oct 13, 2009
    2,333
    Clinton MD
    There really isn't a strength difference between spinning and casting reels. Theoretically you can clamp down the drag on a baitcaster more, but in reality I don't think that's true any more. In either case, your line is going to be more of a restriction than the reel will be.

    Solution: buy one of each and see what you like!

    Seriously, you're going to want at least two rods out on a kayak, because the last thing you want is to paddle all the way to a good spot and have your one rod combo break down on you. You'll need a backup. Might as well have a variety. That way you'll learn which you like better for each type of fishing.

    ETA: Outrider makes a good point about your back cast and hitting one of the rods in your rod holder. I just put the rod I'm not using in the left hand holder, since I cast right handed. That gives me about 260 degrees of room for casting.
    I like this line of thinking. I think I will get one and just try it out.
    As far as interference with the other rods, my kayak has provision for horizontal rod storage along the inside of the gunwale with the rod tips going up into to bow. I suppose I could keep the spare rods there instead of sticking up behind me.
     

    outrider58

    Pronouns: It, That
    MDS Supporter
    Jul 29, 2014
    37,492
    I guess what I am having trouble understanding is for the same size and strength fishing rod how does the casting vs spinning mechanism make a difference? If for example I was wanting to use a 1/2 - 3/4oz jig head with soft plastics trying to catch striped bass.
    My main complaint with spinning gear is line twist. Sure you can put a swivel between running line and leader, and I generally do when salt water fishing, but almost never while bass fishing. I tie a fluorocarbon leader directly to braided running line.
     

    outrider58

    Pronouns: It, That
    MDS Supporter
    Jul 29, 2014
    37,492
    You dont have to cast a bait caster over head. You can cast side arm and weightless lures. Its mostly what I use. But you have to be good with them or you will have many birds nests.
    If you really want one go with the Shimano SLX DC or Curado DC. Its actually very hard to back lash them. The DC is for Digital Chip. No batteries and completely water proof. The power for hte chip is generated when you cast. I use them to teach kids how to cast them that want to use stuff like the pro's. Its nice to see them happy.
    With that said you will need practice before I would take one on a Kyak. IMHO you can do much much more with a casting set up but a spinning is much much easier to use.
    Sure you can cast a BC side armed. But it does limit your casting distance when you are sitting in a kayak, ass level with the water. My main point was, if the OP wants to get into BC gear, he's not going to want to learn while in his kayak. You just don't pick up a bait caster and start fishing with it right off the bat. There is a bit of a learning curve to it.
     

    johnkn

    Active Member
    Feb 27, 2012
    1,123
    I guess what I am having trouble understanding is for the same size and strength fishing rod how does the casting vs spinning mechanism make a difference? If for example I was wanting to use a 1/2 - 3/4oz jig head with soft plastics trying to catch striped bass.
    Generally, but absolutely not always, you will find that spinning reels have a higher rate of retrieval than a baitcasting reel. Example, with a spinning reel turning the Handle 1x winds 5x on the spool vs baitcasting reel may be more like 3.5 to 1. Again this can vary and there can be overlap. What that can mean is that with the lower (numeric) ratio the baitcasting reel may have more power similar to a 430 gear set in a car vs a 325 rear. A novice or occasional fisherman will find a spinning reel easier to use. I use both depending on conditions. Good luck


    .
     

    johnkn

    Active Member
    Feb 27, 2012
    1,123
    My main complaint with spinning gear is line twist. Sure you can put a swivel between running line and leader, and I generally do when salt water fishing, but almost never while bass fishing. I tie a fluorocarbon leader directly to braided running line.

    A properly spooled spinning reel doesn’t introduce line twist any more than a bait casting reel. Line should be initially spooled on the reel differently in each case.

    .
     

    John from MD

    American Patriot
    MDS Supporter
    May 12, 2005
    16,314
    Socialist State of Maryland
    A properly spooled spinning reel doesn’t introduce line twist any more than a bait casting reel. Line should be initially spooled on the reel differently in each case.

    .
    True. Many folks spool a spinning real the easy way instead of the correct way and they introduce line twist from the get go.

    Just to take out any twist that gets into my spinning reels, at the end of the day, my last cast is a one ounce bell sinker on a swivel which I cast out and slowly reel in. It works really well.
     

    Joseph

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Oct 13, 2009
    2,333
    Clinton MD
    Thanks for all the input guys. Since I haven’t even put the kayak in the water yet I think I will just start off with getting used to operating the kayak and fishing with the spinning rods I have some limited familiarity with already. I will get a casting rod and try that but maybe a little later in the season after I have become more proficient with the new to me practice of fishing from a kayak. I am looking forward to this!
    Thanks again and I welcome any additional tips or suggestions you may have.
     

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