"Sensitive" places restrictions on wear and carry currently that should not be.

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  • GTOGUNNER

    IANAL, PATRIOT PICKET!!
    Patriot Picket
    Dec 16, 2010
    4,781
    Carroll County!
    Rest stops. There is no law that prohibits carry at a rest stop.
    And yes that includes the bathrooms.


    Sent from an undisclosed location.
     

    Gravedigger

    Junior Member
    Dec 25, 2014
    42
    Rest stops. There is no law that prohibits carry at a rest stop.
    And yes that includes the bathrooms.


    Sent from an undisclosed location.

    #7 &11 Found here​

    Where are Firearms Prohibited?​


    Restriction on the wear, carry and transport of handguns and firearms in certain places appear throughout Maryland law and regulations. Below are statutes and regulations detailing the handgun and firearm restrictions. This list should not be considered all-inclusive.
    1. On school property (CR 4-102)

    2. Within 1,000 feet of a demonstration in a public place (CR 4-208)

    3. In legislative buildings (SG 2-1702)

    4. Aboard aircraft (TR 5-1008)

    5. In lodging establishments where the innkeeper reasonably believes individuals possess property that may be dangerous to other individuals, such as firearms or explosives (BR 15-203)

    6. On dredge boats, other than two 10 gauge shotguns (NR 4-1013)

    7. In or around State-owned public buildings and grounds (COMAR 04.05.01.03)

    8. On Chesapeake Forest Lands (COMAR 08.01.07.14)

    9. In State Forests (COMAR 08.07.01.04)

    10. In State Parks (COMAR 08.07.06.04)

    11. In State Highway Rest Areas, unless properly secured within vehicle (COMAR 11.04.07.12)

    12. In community adult rehabilitation centers (COMAR 12.02.03.10)

    13. In child care centers, except for small centers located in residences (COMAR 13A.16.10.04)
     
    Last edited:

    DC-W

    ༼ つ ◕_◕ ༽つ ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
    MDS Supporter
    Patriot Picket
    Jan 23, 2013
    25,139
    Baltimore City
    Beware that MSP’s list lacks context on some of those.

     

    lazarus

    Active Member
    Jun 23, 2015
    9,399
    If there are to be any changes to where gun owners can and cannot carry, the legislative session starts on January 11th and ends on April 10th. I think that any employee should be able to take the same class that we do so that he/she can carry in state parks, state forests, state rest stops, schools, and churches. I heard about an arrest at a hotel after law enforcement was made aware of firearms in a room at a hotel/inn. I am on the fence about people carrying a firearm at a hotel/inn.
    Maryland Manual On-Line, n.d., 2023 Legislative Session, https://msa.maryland.gov/msa/mdmanual/07leg/html/sessions/2023.html
    It is legal to carry at a hotel/inn in the state. However, the proprietor can tell you no. Or if there is a no firearms sign posted you cannot have them in the hotel/inn. But it is similar to being on private property with a firearm and being told to leave. Just with higher direct consequences of losing your lodging and possibly dealing with a dickish hotel management who might try to refuse to refund your stay. Despite the below stating the most they can dock you is how much you've used rounded up to the closest full day. Because of course no motel management have NEVER been predatory or dickish to anyone ever. And of course all police know all laws in detail. So when they show up after you've gotten into an argument with the motel management that they are kicking you out and refusing to refund your stay, there is no chance you won't get arrested in the end or anything else like that.

    So long as there are no signs and no one says anything, you are okay. I'd be extremely discrete however on many levels. I don't want someone knowing there are guns in my room to steal if I, say, go out to dinner. And if they haven't posted and don't say anything, why bring attention to it and give them that chance to say no?

    IMHO, you are probably just fine in Western or Eastern Maryland. Probably southern Maryland. MoCo, Hoco, Baltimore, maybe a lot less so. It is a reason when I go out hunting in Western Maryland and the Eastern shore I choose to stay at motels where room access is from the outside so less chance of management seeing me carrying a rifle case into my room and having that chance to tell me "we don't want your kind here".

    See (a)(7) and all of (b). Operative word is MAY refuse. Not must.


    (a) An innkeeper may refuse to provide lodging or services to or may remove from a lodging establishment an individual who:
    (1) refuses to pay or is unable to pay for lodging or services;
    (2) while on the premises of the lodging establishment is under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or other intoxicating substance so as to create a public nuisance;
    (3) while on the premises is disorderly so as to create a public nuisance;
    (4) destroys, damages, or defaces property of the lodging establishment or its guests, or threatens to do so;
    (5) the innkeeper reasonably believes is using the lodging establishment for the unlawful possession or use of a controlled dangerous substance in violation of Title 5 of the Criminal Law Article or for the consumption of alcohol by an individual under the age of 21 years in violation of Article 2B, § 12-108 of the Code;
    (6) the innkeeper reasonably believes possesses property that may be dangerous to other individuals, such as firearms or explosives; or
    (7) refuses to abide by any conspicuously posted rule or policy of the lodging establishment.

    (b) (1) If an innkeeper seeks to remove an individual from a lodging establishment as provided under this section, the innkeeper shall:
    (i) notify the individual, either orally or in writing, that the lodging establishment refuses to provide further lodging or services to the individual and that the individual should immediately leave the lodging establishment; and
    (ii) if the individual has paid for lodging or services in advance, refund any unused portion of the advance payment, but the lodging establishment may withhold payment for a full day's lodging if the individual was lodged for a portion of a day.

    (2) If an individual attempts to remain in a lodging establishment after having been requested to leave under the provisions of this section, an innkeeper may:
    (i) if the individual is a guest, lock the door of the individual's room;
    (ii) remove the individual's baggage and other personal property; and
    (iii) using no more force than necessary, eject the individual from the lodging establishment.
     
    Last edited:

    lazarus

    Active Member
    Jun 23, 2015
    9,399
    Beware that MSP’s list lacks context on some of those.

    That's for sure. Both see my full text on the inn keeper law. Also if you go to COMAR on the rest stops, it just says display or discharge is prohibited.

    Of course. if you combine no displaying or discharging of firearms at a rest stop, with the blanket "no open or concealed carrying of firearms" in a government building means you should lockup your gun at a rest stop unless you are just pumping gas. I am not sure the status of the few gas stations as Maryland rest stops (if the building it privately or publicly owned) and you'd be outdoors, so fine so long as the handgun was concealed. However, all other facilities at Maryland rest stops are state property, therefore you cannot carry a firearm into them.
     

    cyberalex

    Junior Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jul 29, 2022
    69
    Federalsburg, Maryland
    It is legal to carry at a hotel/inn in the state. However, the proprietor can tell you no. Or if there is a no firearms sign posted you cannot have them in the hotel/inn. But it is similar to being on private property with a firearm and being told to leave. Just with higher direct consequences of losing your lodging and possibly dealing with a dickish hotel management who might try to refuse to refund your stay. Despite the below stating the most they can dock you is how much you've used rounded up to the closest full day. Because of course no motel management have NEVER been predatory or dickish to anyone ever. And of course all police know all laws in detail. So when they show up after you've gotten into an argument with the motel management that they are kicking you out and refusing to refund your stay, there is no chance you won't get arrested in the end or anything else like that.

    So long as there are no signs and no one says anything, you are okay. I'd be extremely discrete however on many levels. I don't want someone knowing there are guns in my room to steal if I, say, go out to dinner. And if they haven't posted and don't say anything, why bring attention to it and give them that chance to say no?

    IMHO, you are probably just fine in Western or Eastern Maryland. Probably southern Maryland. MoCo, Hoco, Baltimore, maybe a lot less so. It is a reason when I go out hunting in Western Maryland and the Eastern shore I choose to stay at motels where room access is from the outside so less chance of management seeing me carrying a rifle case into my room and having that chance to tell me "we don't want your kind here".

    See (a)(7) and all of (b). Operative word is MAY refuse. Not must.


    (a) An innkeeper may refuse to provide lodging or services to or may remove from a lodging establishment an individual who:
    (1) refuses to pay or is unable to pay for lodging or services;
    (2) while on the premises of the lodging establishment is under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or other intoxicating substance so as to create a public nuisance;
    (3) while on the premises is disorderly so as to create a public nuisance;
    (4) destroys, damages, or defaces property of the lodging establishment or its guests, or threatens to do so;
    (5) the innkeeper reasonably believes is using the lodging establishment for the unlawful possession or use of a controlled dangerous substance in violation of Title 5 of the Criminal Law Article or for the consumption of alcohol by an individual under the age of 21 years in violation of Article 2B, § 12-108 of the Code;
    (6) the innkeeper reasonably believes possesses property that may be dangerous to other individuals, such as firearms or explosives; or
    (7) refuses to abide by any conspicuously posted rule or policy of the lodging establishment.

    (b) (1) If an innkeeper seeks to remove an individual from a lodging establishment as provided under this section, the innkeeper shall:
    (i) notify the individual, either orally or in writing, that the lodging establishment refuses to provide further lodging or services to the individual and that the individual should immediately leave the lodging establishment; and
    (ii) if the individual has paid for lodging or services in advance, refund any unused portion of the advance payment, but the lodging establishment may withhold payment for a full day's lodging if the individual was lodged for a portion of a day.

    (2) If an individual attempts to remain in a lodging establishment after having been requested to leave under the provisions of this section, an innkeeper may:
    (i) if the individual is a guest, lock the door of the individual's room;
    (ii) remove the individual's baggage and other personal property; and
    (iii) using no more force than necessary, eject the individual from the lodging establishment.
    Awesome! Thank you so much.
     

    lazarus

    Active Member
    Jun 23, 2015
    9,399
    Awesome! Thank you so much.
    As I mentioned in that, the mindfulness that they can kick you out and your only real recourse is to obey and if they aren't being reasonable on the charges for whatever part of your stay you didn't use, you can maybe argue with your credit card company. I guess you could all the police to try to resolve it, but I doubt they'll be helpful (and TBH, why would police be helpful in trying to resolve a dispute between a merchant and customer? That isn't their job).

    Also I have heard from several LEO and ex-LEO that "you can't have a gun in an inn in Maryland". Which is of course inaccurate. Of note, you cannot have smokeless powder or black powder in an inn in Maryland (that is actually a crime, so also if you are staying somewhere don't bring your reloading supplies into your room, or muzzle loader hunting).

    So I'd guess a reasonable chance if hotel/motel management decided to call police on you because they saw you had a gun/gun in your room, you'd have a high likelihood of getting arrested, or at least spend awhile getting a supervisor and probably getting things worked out. To me a high likelihood means better than 1 in 10 when it comes to the pain that would involve and also now having an arrest record. I'd imagine not a good chance of an "inn keeper" just calling police on you. But also see my advice when it comes where I wouldn't chance having a gun at a motel, hotel, or holiday inn in this state.

    Maybe one of the other things that will get smoothed out with time and expanded W&C in Maryland is better acceptance of guns places where they are already legal, but might be excluded, with high consequences for the person being excluded.
     

    cyberalex

    Junior Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jul 29, 2022
    69
    Federalsburg, Maryland
    As I mentioned in that, the mindfulness that they can kick you out and your only real recourse is to obey and if they aren't being reasonable on the charges for whatever part of your stay you didn't use, you can maybe argue with your credit card company. I guess you could all the police to try to resolve it, but I doubt they'll be helpful (and TBH, why would police be helpful in trying to resolve a dispute between a merchant and customer? That isn't their job).

    Also I have heard from several LEO and ex-LEO that "you can't have a gun in an inn in Maryland". Which is of course inaccurate. Of note, you cannot have smokeless powder or black powder in an inn in Maryland (that is actually a crime, so also if you are staying somewhere don't bring your reloading supplies into your room, or muzzle loader hunting).

    So I'd guess a reasonable chance if hotel/motel management decided to call police on you because they saw you had a gun/gun in your room, you'd have a high likelihood of getting arrested, or at least spend awhile getting a supervisor and probably getting things worked out. To me a high likelihood means better than 1 in 10 when it comes to the pain that would involve and also now having an arrest record. I'd imagine not a good chance of an "inn keeper" just calling police on you. But also see my advice when it comes where I wouldn't chance having a gun at a motel, hotel, or holiday inn in this state.

    Maybe one of the other things that will get smoothed out with time and expanded W&C in Maryland is better acceptance of guns places where they are already legal, but might be excluded, with high consequences for the person being excluded.
    Realistically, I would only have the gun in a guncase, not on my person, so that nobody would actually see the gun. I do not have reloading supplies at the moment, but I do anticipate having them in the future if ammunition were to be too expensive to buy in bulk.
     

    GiveMeABreak

    Junior Member
    Aug 14, 2020
    45
    Should be able to carry any wear..,. Day care, hospital maternity wards, funerals, the sky is the limit! After all the 2nd admenmen.
     

    cyberalex

    Junior Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jul 29, 2022
    69
    Federalsburg, Maryland
    Likely intentional. They can incriminate more people.
    I agree with you on that. From what I understand, the Obama administration started the train on what would be classified as "profit" in order to make distinctions between ordinary people and FFLs (Federal Firearms Licensees). Would $10, $50, or $100 be considered "profit"? How many sales would be considered illegal? You cannot use a blanket rule on everybody.
    1: Not everyone pays the same in taxes overall.
    2: Are you talking about someone making a single firearm sale in general or once a month or year?
     

    cyberalex

    Junior Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jul 29, 2022
    69
    Federalsburg, Maryland
    Politics is intrinsically a game of screwing over the other team.
    Also, it's like football. We represent the referees because if we do not know the rules, we will ruin it for everyone, no matter which team we penalize a player from. If we do know the rules, we can prevent a player from breaking them and keeping everyone in line.
     
    Oct 29, 2021
    598
    Dallas, texas
    It is legal to carry at a hotel/inn in the state. However, the proprietor can tell you no. Or if there is a no firearms sign posted you cannot have them in the hotel/inn. But it is similar to being on private property with a firearm and being told to leave. Just with higher direct consequences of losing your lodging and possibly dealing with a dickish hotel management who might try to refuse to refund your stay. Despite the below stating the most they can dock you is how much you've used rounded up to the closest full day. Because of course no motel management have NEVER been predatory or dickish to anyone ever. And of course all police know all laws in detail. So when they show up after you've gotten into an argument with the motel management that they are kicking you out and refusing to refund your stay, there is no chance you won't get arrested in the end or anything else like that.

    So long as there are no signs and no one says anything, you are okay. I'd be extremely discrete however on many levels. I don't want someone knowing there are guns in my room to steal if I, say, go out to dinner. And if they haven't posted and don't say anything, why bring attention to it and give them that chance to say no?

    IMHO, you are probably just fine in Western or Eastern Maryland. Probably southern Maryland. MoCo, Hoco, Baltimore, maybe a lot less so. It is a reason when I go out hunting in Western Maryland and the Eastern shore I choose to stay at motels where room access is from the outside so less chance of management seeing me carrying a rifle case into my room and having that chance to tell me "we don't want your kind here".

    See (a)(7) and all of (b). Operative word is MAY refuse. Not must.


    (a) An innkeeper may refuse to provide lodging or services to or may remove from a lodging establishment an individual who:
    (1) refuses to pay or is unable to pay for lodging or services;
    (2) while on the premises of the lodging establishment is under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or other intoxicating substance so as to create a public nuisance;
    (3) while on the premises is disorderly so as to create a public nuisance;
    (4) destroys, damages, or defaces property of the lodging establishment or its guests, or threatens to do so;
    (5) the innkeeper reasonably believes is using the lodging establishment for the unlawful possession or use of a controlled dangerous substance in violation of Title 5 of the Criminal Law Article or for the consumption of alcohol by an individual under the age of 21 years in violation of Article 2B, § 12-108 of the Code;
    (6) the innkeeper reasonably believes possesses property that may be dangerous to other individuals, such as firearms or explosives; or
    (7) refuses to abide by any conspicuously posted rule or policy of the lodging establishment.

    (b) (1) If an innkeeper seeks to remove an individual from a lodging establishment as provided under this section, the innkeeper shall:
    (i) notify the individual, either orally or in writing, that the lodging establishment refuses to provide further lodging or services to the individual and that the individual should immediately leave the lodging establishment; and
    (ii) if the individual has paid for lodging or services in advance, refund any unused portion of the advance payment, but the lodging establishment may withhold payment for a full day's lodging if the individual was lodged for a portion of a day.

    (2) If an individual attempts to remain in a lodging establishment after having been requested to leave under the provisions of this section, an innkeeper may:
    (i) if the individual is a guest, lock the door of the individual's room;
    (ii) remove the individual's baggage and other personal property; and
    (iii) using no more force than necessary, eject the individual from the lodging establishment.

    why credit cards are so nice to pay with. Especially if you know credit law.

    I had issues with one hotel once. Not over guns kind you, over other issues. I told my credit card card company that I did not receive the services I paid for,, and wish to dispute the charges under federal credit law. They removed the charges, charged the hotel back. I have never heard from them again.

    Now if a hotel doesn’t have a sign, I am very discrete about entering and exiting with my firearms. But if a hotel asked me to leave and refused to offer me a refund on any part of the stay that I wasn’t able to use. I would file a dispute with my credit card.

    I have NEVER had an issue with any dispute over my credit card.
     

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