Reloading Press Type and Prefered Manufacurer

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  • What type of press do you use and what manufacturer do you have.

    • 1. Single Stage Press

      Votes: 36 70.6%
    • 2. Turret Press

      Votes: 13 25.5%
    • 3. Progressive Press

      Votes: 23 45.1%
    • a. Dillion

      Votes: 23 45.1%
    • b. Frank Fort Arsenal

      Votes: 0 0.0%
    • c. Hornady

      Votes: 3 5.9%
    • d. Lee

      Votes: 17 33.3%
    • f. Lyman

      Votes: 7 13.7%
    • g. RCBS

      Votes: 24 47.1%
    • h. redding

      Votes: 4 7.8%

    • Total voters
      51

    bigmancrisler

    2A Preacher
    Jun 4, 2020
    1,249
    Martinsburg, WV
    For the longest time I ran a lee budget turret press, I still use it but not nearly as much. Now I have a load master, app press, a second budget press and a pro 1000. Second turret and pro 1000 are still in the box though


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

    Neutron

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Nov 20, 2014
    1,283
    severna park
    I use a Lee classic turret press for pistol caliber and an old Lyman single stage for 30-30 rifle (The only rifle caliber I load for). I had a Lee auto breach lock press that I could not get to work satisfactorily, so I sold it.
     

    trickg

    Guns 'n Drums
    Jul 22, 2008
    12,340
    Glen Burnie
    - Also when I first got the Dillon I ordered a bunch of parts for converting between calibers, and got new powder funnels direct from Dillon with surface rust. I when I called Dillon the service rep argued with me for a while that the powder funnels would work just fine despite rust, and it took persistence to get Dillon to process the replacement :mad54:.
    Interesting. I've gotten some Dillon powder funnels with a bit of surface rust. I just cleaned them with WD40 and fine steel wool and called it a day. Mine seem to work just fine and didn't need to be replaced. They are harded steel and hard enough that once the surface rust is off, the tolerances are still fine, and that seems to be the consensus I've read online - remove the rust, polish, and it's good to go. Pretty sure they didn't need to be completely replaced, which might be why the guy at Dillon suggested that to you.
     

    trickg

    Guns 'n Drums
    Jul 22, 2008
    12,340
    Glen Burnie
    At some point I'd like to get a better single stage press. When I started, I bought a Lee challenger kit, but I'd like to upgrade that to something a bit more robust - probably a Rock Chucker, but maybe a Hornady LNL or Forster - I haven't researched it enough yet to really know what I'd want, although the Rock Chucker seems to be the press all other single stage presses are compared to.
     

    erwos

    The Hebrew Hammer
    MDS Supporter
    Mar 25, 2009
    12,984
    Rockville, MD
    At some point I'd like to get a better single stage press. When I started, I bought a Lee challenger kit, but I'd like to upgrade that to something a bit more robust - probably a Rock Chucker, but maybe a Hornady LNL or Forster - I haven't researched it enough yet to really know what I'd want, although the Rock Chucker seems to be the press all other single stage presses are compared to.
    Genuine question: what does a "better" single stage get you? My only beef with the Lee Classic is that the priming system is awful. Everything else seems acceptable enough.
     

    Kelson1066

    Active Member
    Jul 31, 2012
    1,028
    Frederick County
    I love the Lee cast iron 4 hole turret for all my rifle reloading especially since I didn't have to buy a single stage press. I have a Lee Pro 1000 for all my pistol loads with the lee precision powder measure.

    Gave my turret press to a friend who wanted to start reloading 9mm for competition. He wants to get a Dillon but this is something to cut his teeth on. Hopefully I'll get it back. If not just have to buy a new one.
     

    trickg

    Guns 'n Drums
    Jul 22, 2008
    12,340
    Glen Burnie
    Genuine question: what does a "better" single stage get you? My only beef with the Lee Classic is that the priming system is awful. Everything else seems acceptable enough.
    The one thing you can't really get on the Lee Challenger is that it doesn't bottom out like Rock Chucker, so when you are setting up a die for a slight cam-over, it's not something you can really do - it doesn't have that same hard stop at the end of the ram stroke. There's a little bit of flex in that press, and there's absolutely no flex in the Rock Chucker - it's built too heavy.
     
    Last edited:

    Trekker

    Member
    Oct 20, 2011
    651
    Harford County
    Interesting. I've gotten some Dillon powder funnels with a bit of surface rust. I just cleaned them with WD40 and fine steel wool and called it a day. Mine seem to work just fine and didn't need to be replaced. They are harded steel and hard enough that once the surface rust is off, the tolerances are still fine, and that seems to be the consensus I've read online - remove the rust, polish, and it's good to go. Pretty sure they didn't need to be completely replaced, which might be why the guy at Dillon suggested that to you.
    Could well have used steel wool or sandpaper to clean the powder funnels. Still, given the price of Dillon components, I was rather disappointed to buy direct from the manufacturer, and receive parts with visually obvious rust. It was also not a light dusting of orange that should come off with a couple wipes, but more like the wet tool you forgot to dry and wipe some oil on, and got pushed back on your cluttered workbench and forgotten for a while.

    If I already had a good relationship with Dillon I probably would have thought to save them the bother, and just cleaned the parts myself. At the time though, this was my introduction to using Dillon equipment, and not the best first impression.

    Minding that they can be a bit inclined to rust, I lightly wipe the powder funnel with a bit of oil when storing them away, but have to remember to wipe the surface dry (powder sticking to oil) when I I get them out for another production run.
     

    trickg

    Guns 'n Drums
    Jul 22, 2008
    12,340
    Glen Burnie
    Could well have used steel wool or sandpaper to clean the powder funnels. Still, given the price of Dillon components, I was rather disappointed to buy direct from the manufacturer, and receive parts with visually obvious rust. It was also not a light dusting of orange that should come off with a couple wipes, but more like the wet tool you forgot to dry and wipe some oil on, and got pushed back on your cluttered workbench and forgotten for a while.

    If I already had a good relationship with Dillon I probably would have thought to save them the bother, and just cleaned the parts myself. At the time though, this was my introduction to using Dillon equipment, and not the best first impression.

    Minding that they can be a bit inclined to rust, I lightly wipe the powder funnel with a bit of oil when storing them away, but have to remember to wipe the surface dry (powder sticking to oil) when I I get them out for another production run.
    I get it - I had at least one powder funnel that came that way - I'm not sure why they aren't oiled or placed in oil paper before they get stored, but for whatever reason, they had some surface rust on them.

    I've also taken apart a powder die and funnel that I've used for a while and found rust on it - I think whatever steel they are using for that particular component is prone to it. That, or perhaps they got some moisture in their storage area that didn't get handled well, although being in Scottsdale, AZ, I'm surprised that humidity would be an issue at all.

    Overall I've been very pleased with my Dillon 550. I find that sometimes, if all I'm doing is a batch of 100, it takes me more time to set up the press and make sure that the powder measure is calibrated than it takes me to actually reload - 100 rounds goes by pretty quickly on a press that runs that smoothly.
     

    Sticky

    Beware of Dog
    MDS Supporter
    Mar 16, 2013
    4,022
    AA Co
    At some point I'd like to get a better single stage press. When I started, I bought a Lee challenger kit, but I'd like to upgrade that to something a bit more robust - probably a Rock Chucker, but maybe a Hornady LNL or Forster - I haven't researched it enough yet to really know what I'd want, although the Rock Chucker seems to be the press all other single stage presses are compared to.
    I have used a Rockchucker since I started eons ago. They are solid, not real pricey and just flat work. I have loaded thousands of rounds, pistol, rifle, all calibers, precision rifle, plinking.. you name it. I have not tried any of the newer offerings, but I did just finally make a quantum leap into the progressive movement. I'll post some pics soon, think all my parts will be getting here tomorrow
     
    Genuine question: what does a "better" single stage get you? My only beef with the Lee Classic is that the priming system is awful. Everything else seems acceptable enough.
    I have a RCBS JR3 which is similar to the Rock Chucker. I bought it used and it didn't have all the priming parts so I never got to try it out. But it came with a separate RCBS hand primer all for $25 or 30 at a gun show in the 90's. I watched some videos recently to see if I wanted to get the primer parts for it. I'm still hand priming. Initially I used it for depriming before vibra cleaning (all my cases) and loading low volume 45 Auto Rim for my S&W 625. Now I'm using it in higher volume for 45 Colt for my New Vaquero and added a roller lever from InlineFrabrication to the setup. All the equipment is mostly beefy metals with tight tolerances that you could drive a Smart car over and not damage.

    For my autoloaders and 38/357s I have a Dillon SDB. As an engineer, I appreciate the design of their equipment. I think I was one of the first to ask about a 357 Sig conversion kit since it came piece meal for free with a request to let them know how it works out. As a some time test engineer, I gave them a 2 page evaluation. I recently had to contact Dillon support for a few parts for my SDB which they provided promptly for free. These were parts that "went missing" and I would have happily (well not so much) paid for. I later found out that the shell plate buttons are actually available on their web page for purchase. They were in the middle of revamping their web site and not all the links were working when I went looking so I just emailed them and they sent me the parts.
     

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