Need Recommendations for My Daughter’s 1st Handgun.

The #1 community for Gun Owners of the Northeast

Member Benefits:

  • No ad networks!
  • Discuss all aspects of firearm ownership
  • Discuss anti-gun legislation
  • Buy, sell, and trade in the classified section
  • Chat with Local gun shops, ranges, trainers & other businesses
  • Discover free outdoor shooting areas
  • View up to date on firearm-related events
  • Share photos & video with other members
  • ...and so much more!
  • smokey0118

    2A TEACHER
    Jan 31, 2008
    28,200
    .22 is better than a pointy stick, but it's not an inherently reliable design, even with good ammo. If it's for HD, maybe check out a comp'd full-sized 9mm. You can end up with a gun that doesn't have much recoil that is waaaaaaaay more effective and reliable than a .22.
     

    Magnumite

    Active Member
    Dec 17, 2007
    6,053
    Harford County, Maryland
    Looks like she wants a revolver in .22. Zeroing in on a S&W model 63.

    .38, .357, 9mm are too much for her. Plus I’m giving her a 10/22 so the ammo will fit both.

    Thanks to everyone for their feedback.
    Good to hear she has focused on a product. 63 is a great choice. Four inch barrel? I have one. As a suggestion if she indicates the grip isn’t quite right, consider a set of Pachmyers for it. They make a huge difference. But as you did with the revolver, let her decide.
     

    alucard0822

    For great Justice
    Oct 29, 2007
    16,104
    PA
    22 in a revolver is probably the worst choice for a pistol that will be used defensively. Little power, low capacity, and probably a better chance of misfires and jammed ejectors than any other caliber. Rimfires take a harder hit to light than centerfire, lots of gas leakeage and short barrels cut velocity substantially, and there are a lot of cheap 22 models that have problems, even S&W/Ruger 22s have a better chance of failure than their centerfire models. ANY able bodied shooter with a decent instructor will be able to use a a 9mm pistol after a couple classes. There is a huge difference between a defensive firearm and a gun for practice or fun at a range where cheap ammo, light recoil and bullets that only need to punch paper are sufficient, this is what a 22 is limited to. A defensive firearm must be durable, reliable, and a sufficient caliber, 22 revolvers do not meet this criteria, although they can be a useful 2nd handgun for easy and cheap general marksmanship practice.
     

    chilipeppermaniac

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Looks like she wants a revolver in .22. Zeroing in on a S&W model 63.

    .38, .357, 9mm are too much for her. Plus I’m giving her a 10/22 so the ammo will fit both.

    Thanks to everyone for their feedback.
    WINCH, YOU ARE GIVING HER A 10/22!!!! AWESOME

    I know you said it looks like she'd want a revolver. But if she really thinks she likes .22's and might like to compare, how about something along the lines of a sweet Ruger MKII/ MKIII?

    I have a MKII Target with the 10 inch Bull Barrel, Very reliable. ( Not saying she needs a 10 inch barrel) as we know these models came with shorter versions as well as the 22/45.

    Also, are you really serious that a .38 or 9mm is too much gun for her?
    What about a ported barreled model? Is it the recoil, fear of recoil, weight or what? What do you think are the deciding negative factors of say a 38 or 9? Maybe consider getting her the .22 with the thought of working on a 2nd more lethal Self Defense weapon as she develops and gets a feel for other slightly more powerful calibers.

    My experience has had me shoot every range of caliber from 22 on up to 38, 357, 40, 44 and 45. I also started by shooting my elem school buddies' pellet guns.

    Now there is another thought for CHEAP(er) target practice. Air/Co2 Rifle/Pistols. She could get good at aiming with lots of plinking and could shoot a shid-ton more considering today's cost and availability of ammo.

    Just a few other thoughts. Good luck.
     
    Last edited:

    Magnumite

    Active Member
    Dec 17, 2007
    6,053
    Harford County, Maryland
    The new shooter made a choice. This needs to be her gun…not ours. This is a recreational arm to a large extent.

    The guy that had a huge hand in development of kevlar vests defended himself against two opponents with an Iver Iohnson 9 shot 22 LR revolver.

    Some guy at a match insisted my son should shoot thumb over safety with his 1911. I told him my son shot proficiently and was comfortable shooting low thumb - high thumb would come with time. He insisted…I told him my son will shoot low thumb if he wants and the discussion was over. Moral of the story…the shooter will develop. My son has asked about high thumb.
     

    Applehd

    Throbbing Member
    MDS Supporter
    Apr 26, 2012
    4,281
    /thread...:D
    maxresdefault.jpg
     

    alucard0822

    For great Justice
    Oct 29, 2007
    16,104
    PA
    The new shooter made a choice. This needs to be her gun…not ours. This is a recreational arm to a large extent.

    The guy that had a huge hand in development of kevlar vests defended himself against two opponents with an Iver Iohnson 9 shot 22 LR revolver.

    Some guy at a match insisted my son should shoot thumb over safety with his 1911. I told him my son shot proficiently and was comfortable shooting low thumb - high thumb would come with time. He insisted…I told him my son will shoot low thumb if he wants and the discussion was over. Moral of the story…the shooter will develop. My son has asked about high thumb.
    recreational and defensive are 2 different purposes. Of course the shooter will make and live with the choice, but figuring the thread was started to get advice, should at least be good advice. Of course there are people that successfully defended themselves with 22s, unloaded firearms, bb guns, and plenty of other things that are either incapable or have a low ability to produce incapacitation. While they may have "worked", it doesn't mean they were a good choice. As far as techniques and grip placement, there are some options, and some room for preference or alternate grips/stances. Most instructors teach a high grip/high thumb as it is superior, but is not always possible depending on the situation. Rule #1 of coaching is it only works if a person wants to be coached, people are free to do what they want at the range provided it's safe, people can learn from others, or eventually figure it out for themselves.
     

    Bob A

    Active Member
    MDS Supporter
    Patriot Picket
    Nov 11, 2009
    21,454
    Rather than a .22, consider a revolver in 32S&W Long. Buffalo Bore makes a hard-cast wadcutter in that caliber that would be far more effective and reliable than any rimfire, with low recoil.

    My old Smith 32 hand-ejector is very pleasant to shoot, far less of a handful than any 9mm, and easier to control.
     

    Magnumite

    Active Member
    Dec 17, 2007
    6,053
    Harford County, Maryland
    recreational and defensive are 2 different purposes. Of course the shooter will make and live with the choice, but figuring the thread was started to get advice, should at least be good advice. Of course there are people that successfully defended themselves with 22s, unloaded firearms, bb guns, and plenty of other things that are either incapable or have a low ability to produce incapacitation. While they may have "worked", it doesn't mean they were a good choice. As far as techniques and grip placement, there are some options, and some room for preference or alternate grips/stances. Most instructors teach a high grip/high thumb as it is superior, but is not always possible depending on the situation. Rule #1 of coaching is it only works if a person wants to be coached, people are free to do what they want at the range provided it's safe, people can learn from others, or eventually figure it out for themselves.

    I figured this was coming. I don’t 22 is an optimal round…but the new shooter is comfortable with that gun and that round. OP seems to have some background and probably a handgun for home defense, located accordingly. The new shooter may be familiarized with it and still enjoy her chosen arm.

    FWIW, unbending insistence on procedural dogma never accomplished much. That is what the fella and his buddy at the match were doing. So it wasn’t my son refusing to learn…he was not comfortable with it. It was blind dogma insistence. Long ago it was one hand, then it was cup and saucer, then it was isosolese, then it was Weaver…all touted and dogmatized and anyone not doing was a loser. Last 10-15 years its “never use the slide lock to drop the slide…”, even when the pistol was built for that…it is blind dogma because it fits those practitioners practice. Sorry, pushing one’s own practices is not coaching.
     
    Last edited:

    Dave501z

    Junior Member
    Apr 12, 2022
    11
    Bel Air Maryland
    Best thing I can recommend is going to a range and renting several different ones and see what is the best for her. Only she can pick.

    That being said I love the Glock 43x/48. May or may not work for her

    Good luck
     

    Art3

    Eqinsu Ocha
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 30, 2015
    8,349
    Harford County
    Ruger makes the Sp-101 in .22. Very nice little handgun.
    Yes! I shoot steel challenge with mine regularly. It's the same frame as the .357, so if one eventually bought both, skills and muscle memory learned cheap and easy on the .22 should translate pretty well to the .357. One for fighting, one for fun.
     

    Art3

    Eqinsu Ocha
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 30, 2015
    8,349
    Harford County
    That is a nice pair Art!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thank you. I really think Ruger stumbled onto some magic with the grip proportions of the SP101. Small hands can effectively reach all the controls (it may not be ideal for the tiniest, but it is still feasible). You may have noticed that my hands and fingers are pretty fat, and most small to medium pistols get awkwardly swallowed up. Somehow...the SP101 still fits :shrug:

    In addition to just being fun, that team is, "Mister-steal-your-girl" at the range. If a potentially gun-shy lady struggling with her man's tacticool rig lets me put the .22 in her hand, it's instant smiles and confidence building. "Wow! I didn't even feel it go off!" After a little bit of practice making sure the grip is good, comfortable, and familiar, we try the other one with .38sp. Sight picture, grip, trigger, hammer are all identical to what she's gotten used to on the .22. The perceived recoil really isn't a whole lot more with .38. If she's confident with that, how about a .357 just for fun? Maybe even slip one in as a surprise amongst the .38 and see if she really even notices. "Hmmm...yeah, maybe one of those was a little louder than the rest, but it really wasn't that bad." Now she's sending heavier lead downrange faster than his 9mm, likes guns, and wouldn't be afraid of defending herself with one. Sorry, ma'am. I'm married. :o

    That's the plan, anyway. Mostly, they just really like the .22 ;)
     

    aeubank2

    Junior Member
    Jan 30, 2022
    7
    My adult daughter just completed the NRA Basic Pistol class and now has her HQL. She is looking to buy a handgun. She will not likely get a W&C but who knows with the SCOTUS decision looming. She thinks revolver might be the way to go.

    I’m gonna take her to the range to check out my S&W 686 and 617.

    She is not sure what caliber she wants.

    Mostly this will be a home protection firearm, but she wants to do range stuff too.

    I’m thinking 4” 686 type which would allow her to shoot .38. She has tried my 9mm P38 and seems ok with 9mm but probably nothing bigger.

    Curious about your recommendation!!

    Thanks
    When first time gun buyers come to my shop, they usually end up with a Glock 19, Glock 43x, SIG P320 or a S&W M&P Shield. I do events where I take people out to my remote land in Nanjemoy and let them try a variety of handguns to figure out what they like.
     

    Blaster229

    God loves you, I don't.
    MDS Supporter
    Sep 14, 2010
    37,564
    Glen Burnie
    The whole "start out with a .22 and build up to higher recoil" thing is a crock. The grip for a .22 isn't sufficient enough for a higher caliber, and they are going to have to learn that grip anyway. But I don't have an NRA Instructor patch, so I'm probably wrong. :)
     

    Magnumite

    Active Member
    Dec 17, 2007
    6,053
    Harford County, Maryland
    Try taking a new shooter out and breaking them into the session with a couple boxes of 9mm, 38 Special...I don't know...40 rounds of 460 S&W. Then give them a 22 and watch what happens.

    I see the 22LR not only as a stand alone tool but also as a valuable training tool. Neither centerfire nor 22LR alone will allow complete proficiency with both.
     
    Top Bottom