H&R M1 Garand Cutaway

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  • BradMacc82

    Ultimate Member
    Industry Partner
    Aug 17, 2011
    26,169
    I’ll have to check in the morning, I want to say your guess is pretty close - but we have a few Garands in inventory right now and I may be thinking of a different one - odd how the mind can remember things like that.
     

    ted76

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 20, 2013
    3,157
    Frederick
    Alan at the Gun Rack in Burtonsville had a 200 or 300 % scale M1 Garand cutaway on display in his shop before he closed up the shop at the end 2013.
     

    BradMacc82

    Ultimate Member
    Industry Partner
    Aug 17, 2011
    26,169
    Comparing this one to pics of the ones in the NRA museum and Smithsonian, it’s definitely different from the’40s era cutaways I’ve seen.

    Maybe it was done during the Korean War period(?), for whatever reasons and purposes, I can’t really say.

    Definitely one of those times where you wish the guns could talk and tell their story for themselves.
     

    BradMacc82

    Ultimate Member
    Industry Partner
    Aug 17, 2011
    26,169
    I’ll have to check in the morning, I want to say your guess is pretty close - but we have a few Garands in inventory right now and I may be thinking of a different one - odd how the mind can remember things like that.
    Doco - surprisingly close, 47282**
     

    mawkie

    C&R Whisperer
    Sep 28, 2007
    4,409
    Catonsville
    I can easily see it as a tool for training new hires for a Garand assembly line. So definitely not ruling it out as a H&R produced item as it does look to be built to a high standard.
     

    mawkie

    C&R Whisperer
    Sep 28, 2007
    4,409
    Catonsville
    Just so I'm clear, I meant high standard to refer to the quality of the assembly and cutaway machining / workmanship. I would expect parts that failed QC would be put to good use, only makes sense. That's what the French did for classroom instruction MAS 36s. They were never meant to be fired so chambers, headspace, etc were all over the place.
     

    BradMacc82

    Ultimate Member
    Industry Partner
    Aug 17, 2011
    26,169
    Just so I'm clear, I meant high standard to refer to the quality of the assembly and cutaway machining / workmanship. I would expect parts that failed QC would be put to good use, only makes sense. That's what the French did for classroom instruction MAS 36s. They were never meant to be fired so chambers, headspace, etc were all over the place.
    :thumbsup:

    I had an idea that's what you guys meant, but you have my inquisitive nature piqued - so if I have the time (and balls) to dig into it, I'd like to see for myself. The bolt and receiver are easy enough to trace, the stamping on the barrel is really light on the 2nd digit of the year, but should be enough to pin down.
     

    lazarus

    Ultimate Member
    Jun 23, 2015
    13,894
    Comparing this one to pics of the ones in the NRA museum and Smithsonian, it’s definitely different from the’40s era cutaways I’ve seen.

    Maybe it was done during the Korean War period(?), for whatever reasons and purposes, I can’t really say.

    Definitely one of those times where you wish the guns could talk and tell their story for themselves.
    H&R and IHA were all post WWII manufacture. 1952-1954 (55?) were the manufacture dates for all of them if I remember right. Korean War time order to bulk up how many we had. So no surprise it looks different than WWII cutaways.

    I’ve got an IHA Garand in my safe.

    *edit* 1956 was the end of manufacture with about 470k H&Rs made. Almost all of them post Korea war as the order was late 1952 for 100k originally.
     

    BradMacc82

    Ultimate Member
    Industry Partner
    Aug 17, 2011
    26,169
    Receiver - 1953, USRifle30CALm1 puts the range simply as between January to December of 1953
    Bolt - is a Springfield, stamping puts it in between June to October of 1945
    Barrel - stamping indicates February of 1964, Springfield Armory

    Seems the stampings tell a different story than what the consignor was told. That's a shame. :(

    Still, it's a well done cutaway. And while it's looking like it may not be a Factory done piece as it was implied to the consignor when he bought it, it's still a great piece for the hard-core M1 Garand collector to add to their collection.
     

    lazarus

    Ultimate Member
    Jun 23, 2015
    13,894
    Receiver - 1953, USRifle30CALm1 puts the range simply as between January to December of 1953
    Bolt - is a Springfield, stamping puts it in between June to October of 1945
    Barrel - stamping indicates February of 1964, Springfield Armory

    Seems the stampings tell a different story than what the consignor was told. That's a shame. :(

    Still, it's a well done cutaway. And while it's looking like it may not be a Factory done piece as it was implied to the consignor when he bought it, it's still a great piece for the hard-core M1 Garand collector to add to their collection.
    That barrel date would make me think it likely was not factory assembled as a cutaway.

    Of course my rifle is not a factory cut away, but IIRC off the top of my head, my International Harvester is dated around 1953 as well (maybe it is 1956? Now I need to go check the safe later today), the bolt and barrel are both Springfield and IIRC late 1945 for the bolt, 1946 for the barrel. Which stacks up as being "original" as H&R and IHA both got a ton of spares from Springfield and some others that had never been assembled into rifles.
     

    calicojack

    American Sporting Rifle
    MDS Supporter
    May 29, 2018
    5,622
    Cuba on the Chesapeake
    Thanks for sharing; I have read about these and seen pics on the Internet but never in person. The cutaways are so well done so it seems to me it has to have been factory/depot made to be a classroom aide from day one. If a hobbyist did that work; well that would be remarkable.
     

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