First Time Shooting a Flintlock

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  • Blacksmith101

    Grumpy Old Man
    Jun 22, 2012
    21,996
    In case you want to know what is actually happening here are some flintlocks in slow motion:




    Lots more videos here:

    Enjoy your new found hobby! Rock Locks Forever. When the primers and smokeless powder are all gone people will still be shooting with home made BP and flint ignition.
     

    JohnnyE

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 18, 2013
    9,181
    MoCo
    Glad to see more people enjoying shooting BP, means you slow down and take your time with each shot, very relaxing.
    This times ten. Just last year I broke out a Colt gen 2 1862 Pocket Navy I've had for 40 years and discovered how much fun it is. I got into casting conicals and ball, and even making paper cartridges. Definitely not the "spray and pray" mentality of too many semi-auto fans today.
     

    Blacksmith101

    Grumpy Old Man
    Jun 22, 2012
    21,996
    The slower pace with more steps between shots tends to make better marksmen because you try to make every shot count. It also teaches better hold and follow through because of the longer lock times.
     

    firemn260

    Active Member
    Sep 15, 2015
    353
    Harford County
    I also recently realized how much fun flintlocks are. I seem to have come around a circle. Started way back in the day hunting with a traditions cap lock. Then a tc thunderhawk and ended up putting a whole bunch of money into a tc encore to get it shooting clover leaf groups. I dismantled that so my son could use it with a 350 legend barrel.
    That led me to acquiring a very nice 50 cal Hawkins flinter from a very generous member on this board. I’ve had so much fun tuning the lock for quick ignition, coming up with a good hunting load using round balls and real black powder. Even took some experimenting on how I primed the pan for quickest ignition. I now feel like im getting the most out of early black powder season and also a extra 3 days to hunt in February.
    As it has been said it’s a slow very personal endeavor that makes me appreciate each step that goes into it.
     

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    danimalw

    Ultimate Member
    Flinters are a whole lotta fun... With quality flints.

    For anyone who doesn't know, forget the milled trapezoid shaped flints (traditions/TC). Those are good for a few shots then have to replace (in my experience from many years ago). I switched to quality hand napped flints and the last longer, provide more consistent sparks.

    And most modern made flinters have touch holes that are too small. Might need to adjust the touch hole.
     

    Melnic

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Dec 27, 2012
    15,197
    HoCo
    Cool stuff.
    Video of 2 of mine.
    Note the amount of sparks with the different flints
     

    Melnic

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Dec 27, 2012
    15,197
    HoCo
    Never done any Black Powder shooting ... but I understand it's a lot like shooting an airgun ... you have to maintain lock time slightly longer because of the slight delay between trigger and firing ...
    oooh, there will be a few people who will argue that :) But it won't be me cause mine are not quite as well tuned.
     

    The Saint

    Black Powder Nerd/Resident Junk Collector
    BANNED!!!
    Dec 10, 2021
    611
    Baltimore County
    Never done any Black Powder shooting ... but I understand it's a lot like shooting an airgun ... you have to maintain lock time slightly longer because of the slight delay between trigger and firing ...

    Not entirely wrong, as above...it's down to the tuning of the gun's lock. My flinters are both customs and have essentially no perceivable difference in lock time from my percussion guns; at least not when they are maintained throughout the shooting session. If I let fouling build I get hangfires, and sometimes it is just part of the sport. A well-tuned lock and properly hardened frizzen is 90% of the work in a flintlock.
     
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