Bambi Whacking 2022-2023

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  • 308Scout

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Mar 27, 2020
    6,477
    Washington County
    Newby question do deer typically start bloating within 10 minutes of dying? It was a lung shot if that helps
    If a lung shot, it's from gulping air in their last minutes. More air than normal makes it to the stomach. Bloat from bacteria breaking the carcass down is different and takes a lot longer.

    How far did it run post shot?
     

    davidb127

    Member
    May 8, 2022
    19
    Frederick MD
    If a lung shot, it's from gulping air in their last minutes. More air than normal makes it to the stomach. Bloat from bacteria breaking the carcass down is different and takes a lot longer.

    How far did it run post m
    Not far at all he kinda fell there 5 yards and started like the running on the floor then passed I’m not sure what happened I always seen on videos that deer run off but I can’t figure out why mine didn’t
     

    308Scout

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Mar 27, 2020
    6,477
    Washington County
    Not far at all he kinda fell there 5 yards and started like the running on the floor then passed I’m not sure what happened I always seen on videos that deer run off but I can’t figure out why mine didn’t
    Any photos? It all depends on the deer and the shot, IME. I've had some drop within 0-15 yards (mostly lung/heart/pulmonary artery shots with observable BP drop symptoms and the inevitable physical drop) and some make an extra 200 yards in a very short time (the latter on clean lung shots where entry and exit points were higher up). I haven't seen the stomach distend as much on the short drops, but it's been on a few I've seen that made it a distance.

    They field dress the same way in any case. Just take care to not puncture the stomach, regardless of if its distended or not.
     

    davidb127

    Member
    May 8, 2022
    19
    Frederick MD
    Any photos? It all depends on the deer and the shot, IME. I've had some drop within 0-15 yards (mostly lung/heart/pulmonary artery shots with observable BP drop symptoms and the inevitable physical drop) and some make an extra 200 yards in a very short time (the latter on clean lung shots where entry and exit points were higher up). I haven't seen the stomach distend as much on the short drops, but it's been on a few I've seen that made it a distance.

    They field dress the same way in any case. Just take care to not puncture the stomach, regardless of if its distended or not.
    6C95F142-2FDD-467A-8E5F-7474EEB48D48.png

    I tried to zoom in on the exit wound and thanks for helping Its my first season and still confused about a lot of stuff I think next time I should field dress before I take pictures but I got to excited
     

    308Scout

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Mar 27, 2020
    6,477
    Washington County
    View attachment 383103
    I tried to zoom in on the exit wound and thanks for helping Its my first season and still confused about a lot of stuff I think next time I should field dress before I take pictures but I got to excited

    Not seeing a clear entry or exit wound from that pic. Always best to take a pic or two from from the side(s). Hard to see what's going on from other angles.

    Congrats on meat in the freezer, BTW!
     

    4g64loser

    Bad influence
    Jan 18, 2007
    6,203
    maryland
    View attachment 383103
    I tried to zoom in on the exit wound and thanks for helping Its my first season and still confused about a lot of stuff I think next time I should field dress before I take pictures but I got to excited
    Congratulations on your buck, sir.

    As for field dressing, well, if it's warm sooner is better but one of my best friends doesn't gut his during the cold at all. He worked out in colorado for an outfitter for a while and they rarely gutted elk or deer that were going back to camp.

    I will probably catch a lot of flak but I subscribe to his method as the carcass has fewer openings during a drag or other recovery operations. Last year I helped a buddy butcher his first one in his garage. His wife came home and found me in the garage, knife in hand, body parts everywhere, while he was taking a leak and she wasn't amused. My buddy wanted to use a processor but I convinced him not to. I actually like the breakdown process and it might sound corny but I think it brings me closer to my food.

    As long as you get good meat and enjoy the outdoors, do whatever works best for you.
     

    davidb127

    Member
    May 8, 2022
    19
    Frederick MD
    Congratulations on your buck, sir.

    As for field dressing, well, if it's warm sooner is better but one of my best friends doesn't gut his during the cold at all. He worked out in colorado for an outfitter for a while and they rarely gutted elk or deer that were going back to camp.

    I will probably catch a lot of flak but I subscribe to his method as the carcass has fewer openings during a drag or other recovery operations. Last year I helped a buddy butcher his first one in his garage. His wife came home and found me in the garage, knife in hand, body parts everywhere, while he was taking a leak and she wasn't amused. My buddy wanted to use a processor but I convinced him not to. I actually like the breakdown process and it might sound corny but I think it brings me closer to my food.

    As long as you get good meat and enjoy the outdoors, do whatever works best for you.
    Thank you! I really don’t have any like major experience to be able to do it myself so I took mine to the processor and haha perfect way to find someone but I agree it’s a good experience so far
     

    4g64loser

    Bad influence
    Jan 18, 2007
    6,203
    maryland
    Thank you! I really don’t have any like major experience to be able to do it myself so I took mine to the processor and haha perfect way to find someone but I agree it’s a good experience so far
    Like most things in life, it is a process that never ends. Sharp learning curve up front but you will never really stop refining the way you do things. It's like shooting. My buddy gutted, skinned, and quartered on location as he had to drive half an hour or so. The property owner gave him guidance on that as he'd never done it. The rest was done on my folding table in his garage. Meat packed and in his freezer. His wife is not as frosty to me anymore. He's on this board and will probably see this thread eventually.

    If you are willing to work and have a freezer, it's something you can do. A vacuum sealer definitely helps. My ex guide friend has several, including one that an entire quarter will go in. Mine is much smaller but still works for my needs. I live in an apartment but I have processed and packed a deer without troubling the friends who have butchering tables. Welded up a gambrel that comes apart. Pulley and line from TSC. A folding laundry hamper and a drum liner for waste. Some line for hanging quarters til they go in a cooler. Once the waste is delayed from the quarters, toss the cooler in the vehicle, double bag the hide/guts/ribs/head. In the trunk. Then into the dumpster. Break down and vacuum seal the meat from the quarters.
     

    davidb127

    Member
    May 8, 2022
    19
    Frederick MD
    Like most things in life, it is a process that never ends. Sharp learning curve up front but you will never really stop refining the way you do things. It's like shooting. My buddy gutted, skinned, and quartered on location as he had to drive half an hour or so. The property owner gave him guidance on that as he'd never done it. The rest was done on my folding table in his garage. Meat packed and in his freezer. His wife is not as frosty to me anymore. He's on this board and will probably see this thread eventually.

    If you are willing to work and have a freezer, it's something you can do. A vacuum sealer definitely helps. My ex guide friend has several, including one that an entire quarter will go in. Mine is much smaller but still works for my needs. I live in an apartment but I have processed and packed a deer without troubling the friends who have butchering tables. Welded up a gambrel that comes apart. Pulley and line from TSC. A folding laundry hamper and a drum liner for waste. Some line for hanging quarters til they go in a cooler. Once the waste is delayed from the quarters, toss the cooler in the vehicle, double bag the hide/guts/ribs/head. In the trunk. Then into the dumpster. Break down and vacuum seal the meat from the quarters.
    Yeah that is definitely something I want to get into maybe next season when I have a bit more room I also live in a small apartment with limited space but moving soon and that would be something to get into!
     

    4g64loser

    Bad influence
    Jan 18, 2007
    6,203
    maryland
    Yeah that is definitely something I want to get into maybe next season when I have a bit more room I also live in a small apartment with limited space but moving soon and that would be something to get into!
    We are in the same boat with the space issues. Maybe start small and just keep a quarter from your next deer and break it down yourself. Definitely get a vacuum sealer. That and a crock pot are the bachelor's best friends! I probably won't get to hunt this year (working seven days a week lately) but if I do or I go help with butchering at night I want to try pressure canning some. My friend does it and it's killer stew meat.

    Don't cheat yourself on tools. Get good knives. I have a couple from guys here on the forum. Take a finer edge and stay sharp longer. And a hint: keep hot water available to dip your blade in. They usually aren't dull, just suety. I got to butcher completely in the field on a trip once, a soup can on coals full of snow boils quick and keeps your blade clean.
     

    lazarus

    Ultimate Member
    Jun 23, 2015
    13,630
    Yeah that is definitely something I want to get into maybe next season when I have a bit more room I also live in a small apartment with limited space but moving soon and that would be something to get into!
    Yup small spaces make it hard, because you basically need to quarter it in the field.

    The issue there is, unless you don't mind taking your time (a lot of it) in the field, you will not get nearly as much meat as taking it to a butcher (if they do a decent job). Of course if you butcher it yourself, you'll get as much or more. At some point. Maybe not on your first deer or two learning.

    But if you quarter out, take the back straps and tenderloins you can reasonably do all of that in about 15-20 minutes once you've done it a few times. But you'll get about 80% of the meat of a thorough butchering. It is what I'd do if I didn't have an easy way to get a deer back to my vehicle and I had to pack it out (and I've dragged deer a LONG distance before. So I mean, unpossible to get out otherwise). Otherwise I'd take it to a butcher, or these day process it myself if I can. I won't process early season deer myself. You don't really need to hurry THAT much. Taking 3hrs even when it is warm out won't cause the meat to spoil. But bugs, hot, ugh. No thanks. I have a large place, but no place I can actually butcher up a whole deer inside. Did that with my first. My wife is not and will not be amused by this in the future. So my second I did on my back porch which was fine (I hung it on my shed to skin it). But it was pretty cool that day. Temps above 60F I wouldn't. Or if I shot it in the evening I wouldn't reasonably have time to work it up that day (too tired, I am not doing it all at 8 at night as I am not remotely fast enough to get a whole deer processed up in an hour or anything like that. I am getting faster). And the butcher I use (M&G) do a really great job, even if it isn't free like me.

    If it was pretty cold, I'd hang it IN my shed overnight and take care of it in the morning. Only if nighttime temps were going to be in the low 40s or 30s. Anyway, in the next year or two I plan to build a detached workshop that will have space for hanging and butchering. As well as a fridge I can hang it in, in warmer weather.

    But it has been progression for me. This season is my 7th season hunting. So far I've harvested at least 1 deer every season, usually several. Last year was my first I processed myself. It was actually a roadkill deer in spring my wife saw get hit in our neighborhood. All the butchers around were closed, so it was me or the vulture. Then I processed a small one New Year's Eve morning last season. I am planning to try to get one later in the season and I'll process it up myself again. But the next one I get is almost certainly going to be taken to the butcher again unless I just get lazy or strike out the next couple of weeks. By November, unless it is a warm snap, it is reliably cool enough I can process it myself outside.

    I will fully admit, it took until last season before I was just SOLID on field dressing. Every other season I did a lot of standing around and scratching my head (not literally, that would have been super messy) somewhere in the process with my first deer each season. I was solid on any other deer that season, but the first one was always much slower. Last season and the one I harvested this season were all fast. I remembered exactly what I was doing, what steps and how to handle them to make the job easier, etc. I won't claim any 3-minute youtube field dressing special for the viewers, but maybe 5-6 minutes once I actually get started. I tend to take my time starting and that was one of the lessons. Go slow and careful. Remember things like put my canteen/water bottle out within reach rather than leave it on my pack. Get my knife out, get the empty bag to stuff my used gloves and knife when done, get my butt out (get one, they are awesome) out of the box and laid to the side, the couple of zip ties for tying off the end of the large intestine/colon, make sure I take my watch off. If dark out, move deer to a spot I can hang my spare light and put on my headlamp (if not already on). Get out deer drag if I need to drag it. Make sure butt is facing downhill. If awkward terrain and large deer, tie off a leg or two to a nearby tree. Then sit down for a minute or two and take some swigs of water and catch my breath. Then to business.
     

    lazarus

    Ultimate Member
    Jun 23, 2015
    13,630
    We are in the same boat with the space issues. Maybe start small and just keep a quarter from your next deer and break it down yourself. Definitely get a vacuum sealer. That and a crock pot are the bachelor's best friends! I probably won't get to hunt this year (working seven days a week lately) but if I do or I go help with butchering at night I want to try pressure canning some. My friend does it and it's killer stew meat.

    Don't cheat yourself on tools. Get good knives. I have a couple from guys here on the forum. Take a finer edge and stay sharp longer. And a hint: keep hot water available to dip your blade in. They usually aren't dull, just suety. I got to butcher completely in the field on a trip once, a soup can on coals full of snow boils quick and keeps your blade clean.
    With the advantage of a kitchen nearby (okay, first one was done in my kitchen to which I regret with my wife's reaction), I just give it a swipe with a clean rag and a couple drags on my sharpening steel every once in awhile. Maybe twice or thrice through the process. I use a 6" Victorinox boning knife and it works wonderfully. I do NOT cut into bone with it though.
     

    Ecestu

    Ultimate Member
    Dec 11, 2016
    1,406
    Definitely get a vacuum sealer. That and a crock pot are the bachelor's best friends!
    Lol. Skip the dedicated slow cooker and get a multi-functional pressure cooker. It does everything. I have a 10 in 1 Ninja Foodi. The air crisp setting is perfect for tenderloins.
     

    4g64loser

    Bad influence
    Jan 18, 2007
    6,203
    maryland
    Lol. Skip the dedicated slow cooker and get a multi-functional pressure cooker. It does everything. I have a 10 in 1 Ninja Foodi. The air crisp setting is perfect for tenderloins.
    This is good advice. I already own two slow cookers and have had at least one since my freshman year of college. I will eventually get an electronic pressure cooker. My only pressure cooker currently is an aluminum monstrosity for canning.
     

    Ecestu

    Ultimate Member
    Dec 11, 2016
    1,406
    It's really windy out here! Unfortunately it's swirling and gusting. I saw a bruiser this morning, but not expecting to see much this evening.
     

    outrider58

    Eats Bacon Raw
    MDS Supporter
    Jul 29, 2014
    49,508
    It's really windy out here! Unfortunately it's swirling and gusting. I saw a bruiser this morning, but not expecting to see much this evening.
    Check your terrain. Are you in a bad spot? One that causes the wind to swirl? I'm looking at my radar and it's showing a very consistent NW wind.
     

    wilcam47

    Ultimate Member
    Apr 4, 2008
    25,874
    Changed zip code

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