Any one CC with empty chamber?

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  • Threeband

    The M1 Does My Talking
    MDS Supporter
    Dec 30, 2006
    25,109
    Carroll County
    Didn't the Bill Jordan book poo poo this stance vs. upright?

    Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk


    Like this?

    iu
     

    Art3

    Eqinsu Ocha
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 30, 2015
    13,224
    Harford County
    I can't watch this latest crop of videos right now, but will probably enjoy (some of) them later.
    I don't know if I could find it online, but I remember seeing an old timey military training video (not sure which WW...I think it was British) ot tv where they flicked their arm and wrist with the 1911 towards the target...like kids playing "cowboys and...whatever." I guess there was a rationale at the time, but it seemed comical by today's standards...almost like Israeli carry, but for different reasons ;)
     

    Threeband

    The M1 Does My Talking
    MDS Supporter
    Dec 30, 2006
    25,109
    Carroll County
    That "flicking the wrist" while shooting was a technique for shooting from the back of a fast moving horse. Elmer Keith explained the technique: you're trying to "throw" the bullets.

    Don't knock it until you have a better method for shooting from a galloping horse.
     

    Art3

    Eqinsu Ocha
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 30, 2015
    13,224
    Harford County
    That "flicking the wrist" while shooting was a technique for shooting from the back of a fast moving horse. Elmer Keith explained the technique: you're trying to "throw" the bullets.

    Don't knock it until you have a better method for shooting from a galloping horse.
    ...and pointing at the sky in between shots let the spent cap fall free and not into the guts while cocking your revolver. The 1911 largely eliminated that problem, and this guy was most certainly not on a horse. However...I guess it's true that, with. 45acp, there is no need to stay on target with follow up shots ;)
     

    Threeband

    The M1 Does My Talking
    MDS Supporter
    Dec 30, 2006
    25,109
    Carroll County
    Blowing down the muzzle immediately after firing is a technique intended to "soften" the black powder fouling.

    Modern black powder cartridge shooters use "blow tubes" inserted in the breech to blow through their barrels between shots.

     

    Art3

    Eqinsu Ocha
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 30, 2015
    13,224
    Harford County
    Blowing down the muzzle immediately after firing is a technique intended to "soften" the black powder fouling.

    Modern black powder cartridge shooters use "blow tubes" inserted in the breech to blow through their barrels between shots.

    An old timer once told my something to the effect of, "A gentleman wipes, but doesn't blow." :rasp:
     

    Sunrise

    Ultimate Member
    Aug 18, 2020
    4,209
    Capital Region
    And they never show it when someone shoots half a mag and has to reholster. Tons of extra manipulating in order to unload.
    Nothing about Israeli Carry is better IMHO. Nothing.

    For carrying, it's worse.

    For storage, it's worse as well. Just put it in a quality holster if you're putting it in a safe or under the bed etc. and are concerned about a discharge when picking it up.
     

    JohnnyE

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 18, 2013
    9,217
    MoCo
    Nothing about Israeli Carry is better IMHO. Nothing.

    For carrying, it's worse.

    For storage, it's worse as well. Just put it in a quality holster if you're putting it in a safe or under the bed etc. and are concerned about a discharge when picking it up.
    Intuition tells me the same thing, but I need a reality check.

    What led the IDF to select this carry method? Could it be among other factors that:

    every Israeli serves in the IDF, so it is a certainty that (unlike us) few are gun people, and that raises safety concerns gun folks are much less likely to have; and,

    the military focuses on mission success rather than the individual, so while a member of the unit may suffer for being caught condition three, other members of the unit will respond.

    Conversely, I am a competent gun guy and can handle condition one carry more responsibly than a draftee, plus I AM concerned with individual, not the unit, success, excepting that the unit I care about is my family.

    I am just spitballing here. Any learned MDS members care to support or flame me?
     

    Sunrise

    Ultimate Member
    Aug 18, 2020
    4,209
    Capital Region
    Intuition tells me the same thing, but I need a reality check.

    What led the IDF to select this carry method? Could it be among other factors that:

    every Israeli serves in the IDF, so it is a certainty that (unlike us) few are gun people, and that raises safety concerns gun folks are much less likely to have; and,

    the military focuses on mission success rather than the individual, so while a member of the unit may suffer for being caught condition three, other members of the unit will respond.

    Conversely, I am a competent gun guy and can handle condition one carry more responsibly than a draftee, plus I AM concerned with individual, not the unit, success, excepting that the unit I care about is my family.

    I am just spitballing here. Any learned MDS members care to support or flame me?
    See here:


     

    JohnnyE

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Jan 18, 2013
    9,217
    MoCo
    See here:


    Thank you for these cites!

    I note from the first article "... chamberless carry to be the best method with the highest gun safety for people with limited training...", and "(m)ost Israelis who carry a firearm don’t carry because they want to. They carry one because they have to. This tends to reduce the sense of personal responsibility for their firearm." This does not describe the majority of MDS folks, and should not describe W&C permit holders.

    The second article cited piles on.

    Most on MDS are not conscripted schlubs who are only following orders, rather, we train, practice, and model scenarios when we may have to defend ourselves. These are two distinctively different fact patterns. Where do each of us fall?
     

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