Accurate 10/22s

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  • alucard0822

    For great Justice
    Oct 29, 2007
    17,609
    PA
    Ooops!
    Yes, proper receiver bedding is always a must for precision rifles. I use single 3/4" diameter aluminum pillars combined with steel epoxy bedding on my 10/22's.

    Installed pillar prior to addition of steel epoxy bedding material (hence the drilled out area).
    4nB5jPA.jpg

    This guy. Some of the new non-Ruger receivers have a rear tang which has a screw as well. For rimfire I don't think a lot of bedding is needed especially in a 10/22. I put a little material at the rear of the receiver to take out a little slop between the stock inlet and the receiver. I do have a pillar bed in my stock as well that helps with getting a good fit with the receiver/stock and the one bolt. I guess the main goal is to have your barrel free float which will help with accuracy.

    View attachment 453203
    images
    45582937874_f262e5dea7_b.jpg


    This is one major difference between accurizing a 10/22 and most other rifles, barrel/V block bedding is critical, bedding the receiver is not. it is all about the barrel and chamber, that is what makes one accurate, everything else preserves that accuracy, or degrades it. The receiver flexes enough that I actually float mine for the best accuracy, bedding the barrel in the area shown above, the block and chamber area of the barrel, then float or bed the muzzle end of the barrel depending on the stock used. You can basically hog out the forend and install a good bull barrel on a stock 10/22, and with match ammo will probably be a 1moa rifle provided you got a decent bolt. Trigger, stock, optic etc are basically to keep you from F-ing up the groups the barrel is capable of shooting.

    I like the VQ trigger setup, and use it on my precision 10/22 with a laminate target stock, oversized controls and auto bolt release. For the rest of my 10/22s, polishing/fitting a BX trigger group feels good, is safe and reliable if you want to save money. I like my precision 10/22, but I LOVE my SBR charger, it is accurate for what it is, but have some minor reliability work on that to run better. The 10/22 is versatile platform, and while hitting small groups on paper that is far away is fun, I like plinking suppressed with the little charger more.

    20240206_112844.jpg
     

    Bafflingbs

    Gozer the Destroyer
    MDS Supporter
    Feb 16, 2013
    4,530
    Calvert County
    This is one major difference between accurizing a 10/22 and most other rifles, barrel/V block bedding is critical, bedding the receiver is not. it is all about the barrel and chamber, that is what makes one accurate, everything else preserves that accuracy, or degrades it. The receiver flexes enough that I actually float mine for the best accuracy, bedding the barrel in the area shown above, the block and chamber area of the barrel, then float or bed the muzzle end of the barrel depending on the stock used. You can basically hog out the forend and install a good bull barrel on a stock 10/22, and with match ammo will probably be a 1moa rifle provided you got a decent bolt. Trigger, stock, optic etc are basically to keep you from F-ing up the groups the barrel is capable of shooting.

    I like the VQ trigger setup, and use it on my precision 10/22 with a laminate target stock, oversized controls and auto bolt release. For the rest of my 10/22s, polishing/fitting a BX trigger group feels good, is safe and reliable if you want to save money. I like my precision 10/22, but I LOVE my SBR charger, it is accurate for what it is, but have some minor reliability work on that to run better. The 10/22 is versatile platform, and while hitting small groups on paper that is far away is fun, I like plinking suppressed with the little charger more.

    View attachment 453213
    Very nice!
     

    WHBD

    Member
    Oct 4, 2023
    93
    Crownsville
    I have a Grey Birch MFG which is essentially a custom receiver with a thread in, vs. slip fit, barrel. I have the one in their LA chassis with the carbon fiber wrapped barrel. I love it and I've had pretty much every variation of customized 10/22s and Chargers and aftermarket. Zero complaints and it looks sexy too.

    ETA: It also has a built in Arca rail in the chassis like my big boys too.

     

    Hibs

    Active Member
    Dec 23, 2015
    934
    Maryland
    I have a TACSOL XRING that is my most accurate "10/22". Yes, you pay for it.

    It's not as accurate as my Christensen Arms Ranger, but, I think it's as good as you're going to get with a "10/22".

    Also have a Bergara and TCR22s, though never cared to line them all up and compare accuracy. I don't do competition, just collect/plink/hunt.
     

    Bountied

    Ultimate Member
    Apr 6, 2012
    6,639
    Pasadena
    I have a TACSOL XRING that is my most accurate "10/22". Yes, you pay for it.

    It's not as accurate as my Christensen Arms Ranger, but, I think it's as good as you're going to get with a "10/22".

    Also have a Bergara and TCR22s, though never cared to line them all up and compare accuracy. I don't do competition, just collect/plink/hunt.
    The Mayberry matches are a lot of fun. I competed in 3. I used by CZ455 first but then after accurizing my 10/22 it was as accurate so I took that and placed 7th I think. They created a new class for semis after that. Not having to break your sight picture to run the bolt was a huge advantage. We shot from 25yds out to 300yds. A lot of nice people out there. One course you had to shoot a card in half, I did it on my second shot.
     

    Russ D

    Ultimate Member
    Nov 10, 2008
    12,002
    Sykesville
    My 10/22 started life as a 10/22T. I did everything I could to get it to shoot consistent groups but the factory barrel could only do it with the best ammo. I eventually upgraded to a Green Mountain barrel, and a Victor Titan stock. I polished the trigger, added a 20moa rail, and a Vortex PST scope about 5 years ago. Now I take it to the range every trip and my son can hit the 3” plate every shot at 200 yards yards rapid fire. It is also much less finicky with ammo, and shoots CCI standard very well. I think I’m going to take it out tomorrow and see if I can hit the 10” swinger at 400.
     

    calicojack

    American Sporting Rifle
    MDS Supporter
    May 29, 2018
    5,286
    Cuba on the Chesapeake
    This is one major difference between accurizing a 10/22 and most other rifles, barrel/V block bedding is critical, bedding the receiver is not. it is all about the barrel and chamber, that is what makes one accurate, everything else preserves that accuracy, or degrades it. The receiver flexes enough that I actually float mine for the best accuracy, bedding the barrel in the area shown above, the block and chamber area of the barrel, then float or bed the muzzle end of the barrel depending on the stock used. You can basically hog out the forend and install a good bull barrel on a stock 10/22, and with match ammo will probably be a 1moa rifle provided you got a decent bolt. Trigger, stock, optic etc are basically to keep you from F-ing up the groups the barrel is capable of shooting.

    I like the VQ trigger setup, and use it on my precision 10/22 with a laminate target stock, oversized controls and auto bolt release. For the rest of my 10/22s, polishing/fitting a BX trigger group feels good, is safe and reliable if you want to save money. I like my precision 10/22, but I LOVE my SBR charger, it is accurate for what it is, but have some minor reliability work on that to run better. The 10/22 is versatile platform, and while hitting small groups on paper that is far away is fun, I like plinking suppressed with the little charger more.

    View attachment 453213
    I would like to find out how to bed a 10/22 V block. Time to do some research.
     

    John from MD

    American Patriot
    MDS Supporter
    May 12, 2005
    22,505
    Socialist State of Maryland
    I only have one 10/22 and it's the basic carbine model. It's accurate enough to get me my Winterseed patch, but I know it could be better. Are there any versions which are inherently more accurate than others? There's at least one rifle version with a longer barrel and there seem to be some with bull barrels from the factory.

    I also accept that with the nicer ones, I'm getting close to the money for the Magnum Research guns. Factory threaded barrels are nice even though I don't play in that game yet.
    I made a lot of money accurizing 10/22's by by just doing three things. 1, cut the barrel breech back enough so the bullet just engaged the rifling, 2, put a piece of 1/8 drill rod (AFAICR) under the barrel retainer and 3, put a leather pressure point between the forend and barrel just enough to float the barrel.

    In later years, guys were selling cut barrels and Brownells sold kits for the barrel retainer. The only other thing left to do is lighten the trigger and you can do that by changing out the trigger return spring and sear/disconnector spring.
    If you are good with a file, you can actually cut the barrel back without the use of a lathe.
     

    Darkemp

    Ultimate Member
    MDS Supporter
    Aug 18, 2009
    7,785
    Marylandistan
    I only have one 10/22 and it's the basic carbine model. It's accurate enough to get me my Winterseed patch, but I know it could be better. Are there any versions which are inherently more accurate than others? There's at least one rifle version with a longer barrel and there seem to be some with bull barrels from the factory.

    I also accept that with the nicer ones, I'm getting close to the money for the Magnum Research guns. Factory threaded barrels are nice even though I don't play in that game yet.
    If you don’t want to get a new unit- Stocks go a long way IMHO, barrels for many as well, mine’s the same as it’s been for about 15yrs- basic stainless carbine with a Hogue stock and good glass dialed in well. Shoots well for me, used to use the first steel Target AGC allowed years ago- small squirrel size at 100yds and would ring it every time. Never adjusted and every time I’ve pulled it out it’s spot on after thousands of rounds.
     

    KRC

    Active Member
    Sep 30, 2018
    610
    Cecil County MD
    alucard0822

    "barrel/V block bedding is critical, bedding the receiver is not. it is all about the barrel and chamber, that is what makes one accurate, everything else preserves that accuracy, or degrades it."

    I have never heard of V-block bedding the barrel only, and not the action, on a 10/22, nor can I find anyone who has done this or even heard of it, except you. (I have seen this on massive centerfire rifles, the kind it takes two guys to get from the truck to the bench.) Could you please post images of your 10/22 with your barrel V-block and floated receiver? I am very interested.

    BTW - a 10/22 with a KIDD barrel, trigger and with the action bedded won the MARS Tactical Benchrest match (targets at 54 to 208 yards) yesterday at Bridgeville yesterday against numerous other bolt rifles, including at least one Vudoo.
     

    alucard0822

    For great Justice
    Oct 29, 2007
    17,609
    PA
    I would like to find out how to bed a 10/22 V block. Time to do some research.

    alucard0822

    "barrel/V block bedding is critical, bedding the receiver is not. it is all about the barrel and chamber, that is what makes one accurate, everything else preserves that accuracy, or degrades it."

    I have never heard of V-block bedding the barrel only, and not the action, on a 10/22, nor can I find anyone who has done this or even heard of it, except you. (I have seen this on massive centerfire rifles, the kind it takes two guys to get from the truck to the bench.) Could you please post images of your 10/22 with your barrel V-block and floated receiver? I am very interested.

    BTW - a 10/22 with a KIDD barrel, trigger and with the action bedded won the MARS Tactical Benchrest match (targets at 54 to 208 yards) yesterday at Bridgeville yesterday against numerous other bolt rifles, including at least one Vudoo.
    There are a few methods, some is from other competitors at some 22 events, and some were suggestions from some other gun folks. In fact Ed Shell first suggested floating the receiver and bedding the barrel, he is a genius that I have mountains of respect for. It worked, and I was able to get some personal best groups and do very well in some precision 22 things like York IWL's egg shoot comp.

    The principal behind it is to bed the most important and rigid component, and float parts that flex with cycling so they can move consistently. In most rifles, the receiver and chamber area are the most rigid, the barrel moves with the harmonics of the shot when fired, and is floated to allow that. In a 10/22s case a bull barrel like this one is more rigid than the receiver, and the flex and vibrations from the cycling bolt is better to isolate from the barrel. "V-block" in this case is the block with 2 screws that mounts the barrel to the receiver, not embedded aluminum V-blocks/pillars in the stock like some precision rifles use.

    I started out building this rifle, bedding the receiver, barrel to reciver fit, and lug, shimmed the V-block with aluminum, and got good results, from around 3-4MOA stock to about 1-2 MOA as I built it. I then use a machined V-block, also shimmed with aluminum, but epoxy bedded it, epoxy bedded the scope mount base, then milled out the old bedding and areas in blue. I smoked and hand fitted the chamber area of the barrel between the flutes and V-block, then epoxy bedded the V-block and chamber area in red. The blue areas are floated with a .010" gauge to set the small gap between the receiver and muzzle end of the barrel to this laminate stock. This improved the accuracy, or more likely made it harder for me to F-up a good group, it has done .5 MOA 50yd groups in competition and run plate racks of really small steel "eggs" under 2"X2" out at 100 yards. This is with Wolf or Eley Match ammo. With a complete VQ or Kidd build instead of using a factory receiver and lower(still all VQ or Kidd and fitted parts inside) this might have not been as big of an improvement, or might be better than this, but can only speak to my own experience.



    20240212_122255.jpg
     
    Last edited:

    joppaj

    Sheepdog
    Staff member
    Moderator
    Apr 11, 2008
    46,237
    MD
    Thank you to everyone who has contributed. Lots of info to digest here.
     

    KRC

    Active Member
    Sep 30, 2018
    610
    Cecil County MD
    Okay - thanks for the great images and description of your "barrel blocking". Basically, the only support is the small area of the metal block used to secure the barrel? Interesting.

    But, with due respect, I doubt that system maximizes precision in a 10/22. Yes, the 10/22 action is not the strongest out there, but it is well strong enough to support a 16"/.925" barrel (KIDD SS Match). And I seriously doubt that the secondary vibrations of the 10/22 bolt action are either significant to precision in a 10/22, or that this type of bedding really isolates those vibrations from the barrel to any significant degree. I would imagine that hanging the action unsupported might actually increase the amount of bolt vibration vs. a tightly held action. (Think about ringing a bell with your hand clamped over it.) I really don't see how this rather minimal bedding of the 10/22 action is superior to a properly metal pillar/epoxy bedded action with a free floated barrel. I just took a look at my PRS/TBR 10/22 bedding and note that with the 3/4" diameter metal pillar and epoxy, it looks as though about 3/4 of the barrel block is bedded anyways. And with the right type and lot of ammo, it can be very accurate/precise. But hey - again, very interesting - and I appreciate seeing other's experiments. Thanks for sharing.

    BTW - At the Saturday Bridgeville MARS PRS/TBR match I got a look at KIDD's new PRS "Tactical Rifle" rifle (perhaps the owner who is a KIDD sponsored shooter will chime in here?) and it appears to use the KIDD two screw design to fully secure the action, with no metal blocks.

     

    PoPo3

    Active Member
    Oct 26, 2009
    364
    Hagerstown, MD
    Kidd barrels are awesome. I have the bx trigger too. Def an upgrade but there are also better triggers out there. You pay for them though. I have $900 in my setup with the scope and am pretty competitive in most of the matches I’ve shot.
     

    Bountied

    Ultimate Member
    Apr 6, 2012
    6,639
    Pasadena
    Here is my franken 10/22. Mostly Kidd parts with the Acculight barrel. 5 shots at 50yds, the black bull is 1.5". 1 flier
    IMG_5147.jpg
    IMG_5146.jpg
     
    Last edited:

    danimalw

    Ultimate Member
    Here is my franken 10/22. Mostly Kidd parts with the Acculight barrel. 5 shots at 50yds, the black bull is 1.5". 1 flier View attachment 454968 View attachment 454967
    Just curious, was the flyer your first shot?

    I learned that my first will always be a flyer vs the rest of magazine. Might not be by much, but enough to drop points in a match. After learning that, waste first round use next 8, swap mag and continue shooting, never run mag empty before swapping out.

    After learning that, scores improved.
     

    Bountied

    Ultimate Member
    Apr 6, 2012
    6,639
    Pasadena
    Just curious, was the flyer your first shot?

    I learned that my first will always be a flyer vs the rest of magazine. Might not be by much, but enough to drop points in a match. After learning that, waste first round use next 8, swap mag and continue shooting, never run mag empty before swapping out.

    After learning that, scores improved.
    I can't recall which one was the flier. I will keep track of that in the future since it seems logical. It would make sense that the first round after the bolt is closed could be deformed slightly and or not feed the same as subsequent rounds have a more consistent loading profile. Good idea, thanks.
     

    alucard0822

    For great Justice
    Oct 29, 2007
    17,609
    PA
    Okay - thanks for the great images and description of your "barrel blocking". Basically, the only support is the small area of the metal block used to secure the barrel? Interesting.

    But, with due respect, I doubt that system maximizes precision in a 10/22. Yes, the 10/22 action is not the strongest out there, but it is well strong enough to support a 16"/.925" barrel (KIDD SS Match). And I seriously doubt that the secondary vibrations of the 10/22 bolt action are either significant to precision in a 10/22, or that this type of bedding really isolates those vibrations from the barrel to any significant degree. I would imagine that hanging the action unsupported might actually increase the amount of bolt vibration vs. a tightly held action. (Think about ringing a bell with your hand clamped over it.) I really don't see how this rather minimal bedding of the 10/22 action is superior to a properly metal pillar/epoxy bedded action with a free floated barrel. I just took a look at my PRS/TBR 10/22 bedding and note that with the 3/4" diameter metal pillar and epoxy, it looks as though about 3/4 of the barrel block is bedded anyways. And with the right type and lot of ammo, it can be very accurate/precise. But hey - again, very interesting - and I appreciate seeing other's experiments. Thanks for sharing.

    BTW - At the Saturday Bridgeville MARS PRS/TBR match I got a look at KIDD's new PRS "Tactical Rifle" rifle (perhaps the owner who is a KIDD sponsored shooter will chime in here?) and it appears to use the KIDD two screw design to fully secure the action, with no metal blocks.

    Hence the explanation and caveat:

    With a complete VQ or Kidd build instead of using a factory receiver and lower(still all VQ or Kidd and fitted parts inside) this might have not been as big of an improvement, or might be better than this, but can only speak to my own experience.

    I started out with the receiver and block bedded, then had an improvement from there by floating the back of the receiver and bedding more barrel/V-block/trunnion area. It was unusual and I didn't think it would help either, especially with the optic mounted to the now unsupported receiver, but it did improve it. Now I am sure a better receiver would be superior to my old pot metal factory ruger part, and that may work best bedded in the same way that most everything else is. Kidd's machined receiver with integral scope mount rib and rear screw would be far more rigid than this, and even now, I would probably bed the receiver and chamber/trunnion/V block area as I originally did with my 10/22. So while I understand that isolating /floating the bolt and receiver in the purpose of making deflection and harmonics more consistent, it could also be due to allowing a receiver with large range of tolerences, or some warpage to avoid putting uneven pressure on the stock/barrel as well. Not really sure why it worked this well, but at least in my case it did improve it.
     

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