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Old February 10th, 2018, 01:47 PM #1
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S&W revolver gunsmith

I'm looking for recommendations for a very experienced gunsmith who works on older S&W revolvers (guns well over 50 years old). Must be in the Baltimore metro area. Who are using these days?

Last edited by python; February 10th, 2018 at 05:43 PM.
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Old February 10th, 2018, 02:34 PM #2
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Most folks want Smiths who aren't using...
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Old February 10th, 2018, 05:01 PM #3
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Based on past experience, S&W revolvers are fairly easy to work on. There are some good videos on YouTube to help if you decide to tackle it yourself. Exercise care when opening the frame. Do not pry on the cover. Use a plastic mallet and tap the frame until it pops loose. The most important thing is to make sure everything is clean and smooth any rough surfaces before reassembly.

I have a Model10 that I serviced about a year ago for the first time. It is now my favorite handgun! Very smooth trigger makes it so nice my daughter loves shooting 125 gr. +P loads from it now.
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Old February 10th, 2018, 05:42 PM #4
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[QUOTE=GuitarmanNick;5099283]Based on past experience, S&W revolvers are fairly easy to work on. There are some good videos on YouTube to help if you decide to tackle it yourself. Exercise care when opening the frame. Do not pry on the cover. Use a plastic mallet and tap the frame until it pops loose. The most important thing is to make sure everything is clean and smooth any rough surfaces before reassembly.

I have a Model10 that I serviced about a year ago for the first time. It is now my favorite handgun! Very smooth trigger makes it so nice my daughter loves shooting 125 gr. +P loads from it now.[/QUOTE

I do work on many of my guns for simple tasks, and have been collecting S&W revolvers for over 40 years, so I pretty much know them inside and out. I'd like to have a nickel for every sideplate I've removed. How bad can you get hurt making a mistake on a model 10? I'm looking for someone to do some delicate work on a gun that is worth considerably more. I could send the gun off, but I want to be present while it's being worked on. Thanks for your input.
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Old February 10th, 2018, 05:52 PM #5
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[QUOTE=python;5099357]
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuitarmanNick View Post
Based on past experience, S&W revolvers are fairly easy to work on. There are some good videos on YouTube to help if you decide to tackle it yourself. Exercise care when opening the frame. Do not pry on the cover. Use a plastic mallet and tap the frame until it pops loose. The most important thing is to make sure everything is clean and smooth any rough surfaces before reassembly.

I have a Model10 that I serviced about a year ago for the first time. It is now my favorite handgun! Very smooth trigger makes it so nice my daughter loves shooting 125 gr. +P loads from it now.[/QUOTE

I do work on many of my guns for simple tasks, and have been collecting S&W revolvers for over 40 years, so I pretty much know them inside and out. I'd like to have a nickel for every sideplate I've removed. How bad can you get hurt making a mistake on a model 10? I'm looking for someone to do some delicate work on a gun that is worth considerably more. I could send the gun off, but I want to be present while it's being worked on. Thanks for your input.
I trust Scott at Scott's Gunsmithing for anything I can't handle myself. But, I doubt he is going to let you watch while he is working on it. I think you'd be hard pressed to find anyone willing to do that.
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Old February 10th, 2018, 08:04 PM #6
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[QUOTE=inkd;5099362]
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Originally Posted by python View Post

I trust Scott at Scott's Gunsmithing for anything I can't handle myself. But, I doubt he is going to let you watch while he is working on it. I think you'd be hard pressed to find anyone willing to do that.
I do a lot of my own work too but if I can't figure it out , I take it to Scott and let him deal with it.
As for watching them work...not likely. If you were to get hurt in their workshop they would be liable.
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Old February 10th, 2018, 09:37 PM #7
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[QUOTE=Tracker;5099513]
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I do a lot of my own work too but if I can't figure it out , I take it to Scott and let him deal with it.
As for watching them work...not likely. If you were to get hurt in their workshop they would be liable.
How did these quotes get all backwards?
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Old February 10th, 2018, 09:55 PM #8
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"Well over 50yo " is not useful . The relevant dividing line is Long Action vs Short Action . Short Action is essentially modern and current . Long Action parts not available from S&W , and secondary market is becoming spotty ( but they are excellent , very smooth revolvers.

The transition occured during aprox 1954-57 era .

Does you revolver have an actual Model Number stamped in the window of the frame ? If so almost certianly Short Action .

No Model Number ? Some transitional models had Short before gaining Model number .

What problem(s) are you having ?
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Old February 10th, 2018, 10:38 PM #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biggfoot44 View Post
"Well over 50yo " is not useful . The relevant dividing line is Long Action vs Short Action . Short Action is essentially modern and current . Long Action parts not available from S&W , and secondary market is becoming spotty ( but they are excellent , very smooth revolvers.

The transition occured during aprox 1954-57 era .

Does you revolver have an actual Model Number stamped in the window of the frame ? If so almost certianly Short Action .

No Model Number ? Some transitional models had Short before gaining Model number .

What problem(s) are you having ?
Thanks for the input, but I'm not for help on how to repair a revolver, nor a primer on actions and model changes. I am a very advanced collector, and know more about these guns than 99% of the people on this forum. I have some specific work that I want done that requires a highly skilled and knowledgeable gunsmith. I have many contacts out of state through the SWHF and the SWCA, but was looking for someone I may not be aware of in the area. I know of several competent guys who can do repairs, but modifications are a whole different animal.
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Old February 11th, 2018, 01:09 PM #10
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Well in that case , no I'm not aware of a local specialist for customizing a vintage S&W. Only aware locally of generalist gunsmiths , or retired PD armorer from the revolver era .

Would be nice to know of one if you find one .
Holster
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