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Old January 11th, 2019, 11:32 AM #21
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coyotes seem to have had literally zero impact on the goose population. If they did, I'd change my mind and be a fan of them. I trip over geese everywhere I go. I could walk through the parks and open spaces with a sword and get about a dozen easily on any given day. But no, I doubt they are getting any geese. suburban cats and small dogs I hear are a popular menu item.

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Originally Posted by Muleskinner View Post
Whether it's being done for conservation or because they don't like the idea of hunters in the woods after dark after March, the outcome is the same..where the yote population should be as close to zero as possible, these regulations allow for renewing the resource and it shouldn't be.

The DNR likes to create stupid regs based on the notion that most hunters would use or exploit any opportunity to violate the law..like did you know if you shoot a deer and have to track it after dark and when you find it alive you are forbidden to put it out of it's misery? Because the DNR believes that hunters would exploit this to hunt deer after dark...ridiculous.. (also another reg I won't abide by)
All the DNR, Park Rangers, and wildlife people I talk to are pretty reasonable, so you should check your biases and maybe try to have an actual conversation with them. Many if not most are fighting the good fight in a state where deer are intolerably overpopoulated and the PETA people are very vocal. I have personally been called a child deer murder.

DNR has other constraints - they have to manage for multiple uses like hikers, bikers, fishing, horseback trails, etc. They have to also minimize conflicts between these groups while navigating the invariable PETA protests and lawsuits. Unfortunately, some hunters are real chuckleheads and poor interactions with chucklehead hunters and the rest of the population that use the land spoil it for all of us. I have seen some pretty dumb ass shit from hunters in the woods. Invariably, a conflict between a hunter and a hiker (for example) comes out bad for the hunting community because some are real dumb asses and its the dumb asses creating the conflicts.

The reality is, the hunting seasons dont have as much affect as you think. People need access to land where they can hunt. Not more hours to hunt. Access to land to hunt is the #1 #2 and #3 biggest problem.
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Old January 11th, 2019, 11:36 AM #22
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coyotes seem to have had literally zero impact on the goose population. If they did, I'd change my mind and be a fan of them. I trip over geese everywhere I go. I could walk through the parks and open spaces with a sword and get about a dozen easily on any given day. But no, I doubt they are getting any geese. suburban cats and small dogs I hear are a popular menu item.
Give it some time. They are an apex predator. Their numbers will grow.
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Old January 11th, 2019, 11:36 AM #23
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coyotes seem to have had literally zero impact on the goose population. If they did, I'd change my mind and be a fan of them. I trip over geese everywhere I go. I could walk through the parks and open spaces with a sword and get about a dozen easily on any given day. But no, I doubt they are getting any geese. suburban cats and small dogs I hear are a popular menu item.
They get a few, mostly young birds that haven't fledged. I get what you're saying though. The winged rats are every where. Next year the bag limit on migrating geese goes from 2 to 1. Because some of the "migrants" are actually residents you can expect the population to further increase
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Old January 11th, 2019, 11:41 AM #24
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There was a dead yote on the on ramp to 95 from 24 in Harford Co. a couple weeks back...just a hundred yards or from a development. I'm dreading the day when a small child is attacked, killed and maybe eaten by yotes...there will be hell to pay
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Old January 11th, 2019, 11:50 AM #25
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As I added above, access to land (not more hours) is the fundamental problem. There are very few places in suburbia to hunt coyotes (resident geese, even deer). That's why they are overpopulated. I bet I could go out right now and be able to kill 20 geese with a suppressed 22 (or 9mm AR), be back by 1pm (leave the carcasses for the coyotes and come back for them), but all those places are private and they dont allow hunting.
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Old January 11th, 2019, 11:52 AM #26
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Discharging a firearm in most of Balco is verbotten big time...in fact i know a few bow hunters who were told by police that they couldn't even practice in their own yards. The proper procedure is to call DNR and let them handle it
Lol we don't need .gov. We can handle our problems
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Old January 11th, 2019, 11:54 AM #27
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[QUOTE=Muleskinner;5441843]
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coyote hunting regs can be found on the DNR e-regs site. Basically: season is open 365 days. Night hunting as well during certain months.

There are coyotes in all counties now and they can be quite fearless walking around in the 'burbs on the street in full daylight.

As for methods, this will vary locally. Firearms restrictions in particular will vary county to county.[/]

I've often wondered why the DNR is attempting to protect an invasive apex predator that is non native and has no intrinsic value to the ecosystem. some of my hunting buddies theorize that yotes were purposely introduced to the state in hopes of controlling the deer population. I'm not sure if I believe that but it would explain why an invader like this would be given protection when other invasive species like snake heads, mitten crabs and zebra mussels are not only unprotected, but destruction when harvested is required. I'm an ethical hunter and follow the state's regulations to the letter, however the coyote regs are where the state and I part ways. I've found too many dead fawns on my hunting property to give yotes a pass when they are "out of season"...If I see one it's a dead one..they are most active at night, there is no reason to protect them during their active hours
Deer are massively over populated. All their natural predators have been eliminated. Good for dnr if they are bringing them here.
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Old January 11th, 2019, 04:23 PM #28
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[QUOTE=StealthMode;5441957]
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Deer are massively over populated. All their natural predators have been eliminated. Good for dnr if they are bringing them here.
Rumor is DNR has introduced them to the Eastern Shore because of the Deer population.

I'm old enough to remember when DNR introduced weed killer to waterways over here to help with navigation. Now lack of vegetation has the water quality, poor at best.

Maybe the DNR guys need to be tied up and left for the coyotes to munch on.
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Old January 11th, 2019, 04:32 PM #29
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I remember when they killed all the sea grass in the Severn, to appease the boaters (voters)
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Old January 11th, 2019, 05:02 PM #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danb View Post
coyote hunting regs can be found on the DNR e-regs site (http://www.eregulations.com/maryland...easons-limits/). Basically: season is open 365 days. Night hunting as well during certain months (Oct-March).

There are coyotes in all counties now and they can be quite fearless walking around in the 'burbs on the street in full daylight.

As for methods, this will vary locally. Firearms restrictions in particular will vary county to county.

In Baltimore County IIRC its only illegal in the metropolitan district, and there is a shotgun exception for hunting too.


http://baltimoreco-md.elaws.us/code/...t2_sec17-2-101
To add, since it is hunting you must obey the 150yd safety zone from occupied dwellings (not your own, or you need written permission).

Harassing livestock, pets or people is a different story. I think DNR basically says to check your county/city ordinances then.

BTW “existing” isn’t harassing, FYI. A fox trying to get in to a chicken coop is harassing. A coyote walking through a field isn’t.

I say drop em, but just wanted to point it out.
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