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Old January 11th, 2019, 05:06 PM #31
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Originally Posted by Muleskinner View Post
There was a dead yote on the on ramp to 95 from 24 in Harford Co. a couple weeks back...just a hundred yards or from a development. I'm dreading the day when a small child is attacked, killed and maybe eaten by yotes...there will be hell to pay
It probably will happen some day. But in general they arenít much threat to people. There have been two recorded fatal attack to humans in a century across the entire US.

They are a threat to smaller pets and livestock and there CAN be attacks on people. But those are very rare and very rarely fatal. Dog attacks on people kill a couple of hundred people a year and send a hundred thousand plus to the doctor/hospital.
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Old January 11th, 2019, 09:00 PM #32
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Originally Posted by Blacksmith101 View Post
Read the DNR Coyote page pay particular attention to the Ecological Implications and Social Implications sections because they are here and this is what is going to happen.
https://dnr.maryland.gov/wildlife/Pa...ap/coyote.aspx

Open season all year long with no bag limit is not much "protection".
That was a really informative read. Thanks!
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Old January 11th, 2019, 09:22 PM #33
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I've seen a few dead ones over the last year in E. Balto Co. 2 along Rt 40 near the Big Gunpowder river. And 1 this fall dead on the Rt 7 bridge over Rt 43. Guys at the BC landfill on Days Cove Rd say they see them all the time along with some monster bucks.
I've only see a live one once where I hunt in Forest Hill area of Harford co, it was a few hours after dark and my headlights caught it crossing my buddies' backyard. We plan to try to get one once bow season closes at the end of the month.
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Old January 12th, 2019, 12:08 AM #34
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The biggest reason they have expanded their range since the 1700s is human influence on different areas. Trappers and hunters decimated the animals that prey on them allowing them to spread. If you look at a map of how they spread and maps of how hunters and trappers moved through the continent it becomes pretty obvious. I don't know if any states really did help them along, but if they did it just got them here more quickly then they would have naturally.
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Old January 15th, 2019, 08:44 AM #35
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mmmm now i wanna go coyote hunting...
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Old January 16th, 2019, 02:05 AM #36
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Originally Posted by Moorvogi View Post
mmmm now i wanna go coyote hunting...
Head to TX.


Frisco's recent string of coyote attacks is super weird, by urban wildlife standards

https://www.dallasnews.com/news/fris...life-standards
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Old January 16th, 2019, 08:04 AM #37
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mmmm now i wanna go coyote hunting...
You know what? I do too.

Invasive predator eradication is an important public service. I have a nice AR and a suppressor that would be happy to help me perform said service....
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Old January 16th, 2019, 01:29 PM #38
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Definitely not introduced or wanted by government officials in any of the eastern states. Most night hunting regulations are adopted for human safety and not as a method of protecting a particular species. Coyotes have progressed across the country over several decades expanding their territory into areas where larger predators have died out (wolves, mountain lions, etc). Coyotes will eat almost anything including scavenging - with the primary diet focus on rodents, rabbits and small prey (which can include pets). They typically hunt alone or in twos (pack hunting is very unusual unless pursuing large prey such as an adult deer). Groups of individuals or bands exist more for mating and habitat than for hunting (individuals are not known to share their prey, so hunting with others is not their preferred method). Will kill dogs to eliminate competition for food, but typically do not eat dogs. There are also some wolf-coyote hybrids that are larger and are more aggressive than Western Coyotes. Some researchers believe that most coyotes in the eastern US are hybrids (either from interbreeding with wolves or with dogs as they expanded their territory). Hybridization can also impact behavior, so what we see in the Eastern US may not follow all the norms of western coyotes.
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