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Old November 9th, 2018, 12:10 AM #1
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Advice needed on M1 carbine stock

I've got a '43 Inland Bavaria Forestry Police M1 carbine with a high-wood stock that I've had for a few years and put north of 1,000 rounds through. I didn't get it from CMP directly, but the person I bought it from did. It's functioned well and has been reasonably accurate for what it is. Last time I shot it, a small piece of wood chipped off the stock where the recoil plate meets the wood, so I promptly set it down and haven't shot it since. I finally had a chance to pull it apart for a closer look.

As you can see, in addition to the chip on the left side (as you'd hold it), there's also a larger crack on the right side starting to form, shown by the yellow arrows. The screw holding the recoil plate to the stock has been tight as far as I know. Can this be repaired (I have the chip that broke off), or is this stock toast? I hate to write it off, since it's a nice high-wood stock in otherwise good shape. Any idea what might have caused this? The only ammo I've been shooting is USGI from CMP, PPU, Armscor, and occasionally Sellier and Bellot. I think I was shooting Armscor when it happened, FWIW.









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Old November 9th, 2018, 01:16 AM #2
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I’d say it can be repaired before being declared “toast.”

It’s been years since I used it but, Brownells used to sell a wood stock glue for cracks like the one on the right ... the stuff would seep far, FAR down into the crack. Geez, that was probably a decade ago, no telling what they have available now ....

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Old November 9th, 2018, 08:53 AM #3
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Thanks, I'll check it out.
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Old November 9th, 2018, 12:31 PM #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slsc98 View Post
Id say it can be repaired before being declared toast.

Its been years since I used it but, Brownells used to sell a wood stock glue for cracks like the one on the right ... the stuff would seep far, FAR down into the crack. Geez, that was probably a decade ago, no telling what they have available now ....

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Was it this stuff, maybe?
https://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...prod13081.aspx
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Old November 9th, 2018, 04:02 PM #5
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Acra products dyed black will suffice for most crack repairs. Gel is good when the opportunity exists to drill a small hole from inside the in-letting and then force the product into the affected area. Even better when the top surface has been relieved with a pin or additional small hole drilled to ensure good flow. Regular glass will weep into small cracks that are developing or that can be slightly opened up with a wooden tooth pick used as a wedge.
Protect exterior surfaces with carefully applied scotch tape. After about 24hrs remove tape and scrape with a razor blade to blend with surrounding surfaces.
When repairing larger chunks or areas with more mass to support the final repair, small wooden dowels or even tooth picks thoughtfully drilled then installed will make for a solid repair. When larger dowels are used relieving a portion of them whether lengthwise or around the circumference will prevent them from backing out once pressure is applied to the glass.

Relieving recoil sensitive areas directly opposite the opposing force will ensure the repaired area will give good service. Especially near a receiver tang. Irrigating the area where repairs are needed with a syringe and lacquer thinner should be done to get a good bond and prevent contamination.

Good preparation and a proven method to bind or clamp areas needing repairs is always a good preliminary measure prior to applying epoxies or glass. When its done well, most thoughtfully done repairs are hard to detect. Observation of manufactures guidelines for working temps and times should be rigidly followed not to mention mixing ratio. Acra Gel is 50/50 which is easy to work with.

Bisonite, marine -tex, acra glass and micro bed will make a solid repair as long as the surrounding wood is not oil soaked or contaminated. I avoid expanding glues that make air bubbles that will be hard to blend, take stain or damage existing finish.
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Old November 9th, 2018, 05:12 PM #6
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This tends to happen with M1 Carbines. Obviously your chip is really noticeable, but most people don't even realize they have hairline cracks there and continue to shoot them without incident. I would just repair it as the guys above stated. If you're worried about shooting it, you could always just keep a ratty Korean or Italian M2 stock to drop it into for the range.
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Old November 24th, 2018, 05:58 PM #7
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You could repair it, but a replacement stock is not expensive. They range from $50 to $200 all dependent on where you look.
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Old November 24th, 2018, 06:42 PM #8
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I'd repair the stock. Older wood is not exactly easy to come by.

As for what caused it.

The AEF records during WWI indicated they ran into similar problems with M1903s stock splitting in the same area.

They said two things caused it. The action screws becoming loose causing the recoil of the action to come against the wood and also wood coming right up against the Tang the recommended ensuring that everyone makes sure their action screws checked to to be kept tight.

They also recommended removing approx. 0.078" around the Tang to have a gap so the recoil of the action is not coming against the wood.

Ballistics, recoil, caliber and design of the action are vastly on the carbine compared to the M1903, but it could be something as simple as making sure your screws are tightened before firing.

Just a thought.
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Old November 25th, 2018, 10:41 AM #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeEaterPilot View Post
I'd repair the stock. Older wood is not exactly easy to come by.

As for what caused it.

The AEF records during WWI indicated they ran into similar problems with M1903s stock splitting in the same area.

They said two things caused it. The action screws becoming loose causing the recoil of the action to come against the wood and also wood coming right up against the Tang the recommended ensuring that everyone makes sure their action screws checked to to be kept tight.

They also recommended removing approx. 0.078" around the Tang to have a gap so the recoil of the action is not coming against the wood.

Ballistics, recoil, caliber and design of the action are vastly on the carbine compared to the M1903, but it could be something as simple as making sure your screws are tightened before firing.

Just a thought.
This. Fix the root cause and repair the rest.

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Old November 29th, 2018, 11:34 AM #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeEaterPilot View Post
I'd repair the stock. Older wood is not exactly easy to come by.

As for what caused it.

The AEF records during WWI indicated they ran into similar problems with M1903s stock splitting in the same area.

They said two things caused it. The action screws becoming loose causing the recoil of the action to come against the wood and also wood coming right up against the Tang the recommended ensuring that everyone makes sure their action screws checked to to be kept tight.

They also recommended removing approx. 0.078" around the Tang to have a gap so the recoil of the action is not coming against the wood.

Ballistics, recoil, caliber and design of the action are vastly on the carbine compared to the M1903, but it could be something as simple as making sure your screws are tightened before firing.

Just a thought.
Good advice. Thanks to all who weighed in. I think the screw has always been tight, but the metal is right up against the wood. I'll do some gluing and trimming over the winter and see if it holds.
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