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Old June 10th, 2018, 02:44 PM #21
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Originally Posted by ras_oscar View Post
Do I need both a .308 case gage and a cartridge gage? Or can I get a cartridge gage, check after resizing to verify trim length, then use the same gage for COL after seating the bullet?

These are the gages I'm looking at:

https://www.amazon.com/Lyman-Reloadi...=308+case+gage

https://www.amazon.com/Hornady-38071...artridge+gauge
A simple set of calipers will give you all the information you really need. I have a case gauge that a friend gave me years ago and I only used it once, it hasn't been touched since.

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Originally Posted by ras_oscar View Post
overall, what I am hearing is FMJ is less accurate than JHP. Correct?
That is essentially correct, for the reasons someone stated earlier.
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Old June 10th, 2018, 02:50 PM #22
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I still go by the calipers myself, never felt the need for a case gage. That small amount of unspent $$ can go to other consumables.
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Old June 10th, 2018, 11:31 PM #23
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A case gauge will tell you if your rounds meet SAAMI standards.

For precision shooting, you want to size your cases just a touch to fit your rifle. For a bolt gun, you size to set the shoulder back 1 - 2 thousandths. for a ga gun, 3 - 5 thousandths.

A Hornady care comparitor setup is more useful than a case gauge.
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Old June 12th, 2018, 09:02 AM #24
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As mentioned at the top of the thread, I am new to rifle reloading. I set up my decapping/full length sizing die this weekend and processed a few cases. Some of them slid in and out of the die easily, but most seemed at the verge of sticking in the die. Not sure why they didn't all feel the same, since they are all once fired brass from my rifle. Gotta use case lube going forward. Most of the cases measured a few thousands over after sizing. My trim tools are on order. Not sure if I should trim then send through the resizing die again. I am more concerned that the shoulder is at the proper point than the overall length, since its harder to measure the shoulder. Am hoping that the case gage will answer that question.

FYI, the cases I have ready for reloading are a mix of Fiocchi and Winchester.

Question: would a heavier bullet and/or load alter the brass sufficiently during firing as to make it difficult to get the brass fully into the resizing die?
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Old June 12th, 2018, 03:18 PM #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ras_oscar View Post
As mentioned at the top of the thread, I am new to rifle reloading. I set up my decapping/full length sizing die this weekend and processed a few cases. Some of them slid in and out of the die easily, but most seemed at the verge of sticking in the die. Not sure why they didn't all feel the same, since they are all once fired brass from my rifle. Gotta use case lube going forward. Most of the cases measured a few thousands over after sizing. My trim tools are on order. Not sure if I should trim then send through the resizing die again. I am more concerned that the shoulder is at the proper point than the overall length, since its harder to measure the shoulder. Am hoping that the case gage will answer that question.

FYI, the cases I have ready for reloading are a mix of Fiocchi and Winchester.

Question: would a heavier bullet and/or load alter the brass sufficiently during firing as to make it difficult to get the brass fully into the resizing die?

Need to use case lube ALL THE TIME! Sure fire way to get a case stuck in your resizing die is to not lube it. I use RCBS spray lube everytime I reload my .223. Put the cases in a gallon ziplock bag, spray a small amount of lube in, shake and let sit for a couple of minutes.
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Old June 13th, 2018, 12:17 PM #26
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Originally Posted by LGoodwin View Post
Need to use case lube ALL THE TIME! Sure fire way to get a case stuck in your resizing die is to not lube it. I use RCBS spray lube everytime I reload my .223. Put the cases in a gallon ziplock bag, spray a small amount of lube in, shake and let sit for a couple of minutes.
Yes, Sir. Will do.

Is it usual to trim brass before or after resizing?

In reloading for pistol with 4 dies in a turret press, I am used to doing everything on the press in one operation from tumbled brass to finished cartridge. I'm beginning to understand that this is not likely going to be the case for rifle, since I have a 5th operation to trim brass.
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Old June 13th, 2018, 12:45 PM #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ras_oscar View Post
Yes, Sir. Will do.

Is it usual to trim brass before or after resizing?

In reloading for pistol with 4 dies in a turret press, I am used to doing everything on the press in one operation from tumbled brass to finished cartridge. I'm beginning to understand that this is not likely going to be the case for rifle, since I have a 5th operation to trim brass.
Trim after resizing. Resizing is often what will cause cases to stretch.
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Old June 13th, 2018, 01:08 PM #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ras_oscar View Post
As mentioned at the top of the thread, I am new to rifle reloading. I set up my decapping/full length sizing die this weekend and processed a few cases. Some of them slid in and out of the die easily, but most seemed at the verge of sticking in the die.

Question: would a heavier bullet and/or load alter the brass sufficiently during firing as to make it difficult to get the brass fully into the resizing die?
Yes, a stiffer load (more powder, heavier bullet or both) will produce more pressure and will stretch the brass more. As a new reloader, you want to remember to ALWAYS start on a PUBLISHED starting load and work your way up when developing your reloading recipes. Remember that different types of brass (military vs commercial and even brand to brand) can make a difference, so work up when ANY variable in your components changes. Good advice for veteran reloaders too.

Get to know what to look for in regards to pressure signs. It'll make your brass last longer and more importantly keep you from destroying your firearm and possibly dying.

In regards to some brass being easier to resize, lots of things could be the reason. Is this once fired brass you bought from someone else, or that you fired from the same rifle? Is it all from the same lot of ammo? Different chambers could have stretched some more than others, different loads create different chamber pressures, which would stretch some more than others. Different cases could have different amounts of case lube on the body and inside the neck.

Even if all things are equal, different cases get work hardened at different rates. Some reloaders will anneal their cases to make them uniform and "soft." Some will also ream or turn their necks to make their neck tension uniform too.

Bottom line, I wouldn't worry about the different amount of pressure needed on the press to resize cases for now. But yes, DEFINITELY lube every case.

FWIW...I use Imperial sizing wax on the case and imperial graphite neck lube on the necks. It's a bit messier (and I need to retumble the brass after sizing to clean things up), but I've never had a stuck case either.
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Old June 13th, 2018, 01:08 PM #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dist1646 View Post
A simple set of calipers will give you all the information you really need. I have a case gauge that a friend gave me years ago and I only used it once, it hasn't been touched since.



That is essentially correct, for the reasons someone stated earlier.
I used to use a case gauge but I fire form my brass now so it doesn't get used.

If I was reloading for a semi auto I would full length resize then use the case gauge to see what needs to be trimmed, It's much faster than calipers.
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Old June 13th, 2018, 01:16 PM #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kstone803 View Post
Trim after resizing. Resizing is often what will cause cases to stretch.
Yes, however I'll give another perspective. If you're using a progressive or turret press, you'll want to trim necks prior to...or you'd may as well use a single stage press.

I do my rifle reloading single stage on a Forster Co-Ax, so I resize after trimming for different reasons.

I've found that while case length will vary slightly after resizing, if I trim after resizing that process can throw off the concentricity of my neck by a couple of thousandths. Perhaps it's my method of trimming, but I feel like I don't really lose anything by trimming prior to resizing. To me...concentricity is more important than a touch difference in case length. I also trim close to min published length so adding a little after resizing isn't going cause any problems.

Here's whats great about this hobby though. Slight variations in process are OK, and you'll find a lot of opinions out there. There isn't really a "one way" to do it.

That said, there are some universal safety things to watch out for...so don't be nonchalant about your process. Keep asking questions and make any alterations to a published process based on knowledge and experience.
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