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Old September 21st, 2018, 09:48 PM #11
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TheOriginalMexicanBob TheOriginalMexicanBob is online now
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Colt revolvers of that generation were really a fine piece of engineering. Several parts performed more than one function and the "[second hand" provided for complete lockup at the instant of ignition. The downside is the handwork and fitting required...even for their least expensive revolvers. Back in the day tuning a Colt revolver after extended heavy use was simply considered normal and gunsmiths and police armorers were well acquainted with servicing them. This was when labor was cheap...now the high cost of labor is why these fine V-spring Colts were discontinued for revolvers that require little fitting and some MIM and cast part as opposed to all milled and forged parts.

It's not that revolvers such as these fine older Colts and Smith revolvers can't be reptlicated today...but few would buy them due to the expense of such hand fitting and older manufacturing techniques and methods.
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Old September 22nd, 2018, 01:37 AM #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOriginalMexicanBob View Post
Colt revolvers of that generation were really a fine piece of engineering. Several parts performed more than one function and the "[second hand" provided for complete lockup at the instant of ignition. The downside is the handwork and fitting required...even for their least expensive revolvers. Back in the day tuning a Colt revolver after extended heavy use was simply considered normal and gunsmiths and police armorers were well acquainted with servicing them. This was when labor was cheap...now the high cost of labor is why these fine V-spring Colts were discontinued for revolvers that require little fitting and some MIM and cast part as opposed to all milled and forged parts.

It's not that revolvers such as these fine older Colts and Smith revolvers can't be reptlicated today...but few would buy them due to the expense of such hand fitting and older manufacturing techniques and methods.
Absolutely agreed! One of the things that is shocking to me is the tolerance between everything. The side plate the gap is basically invisible. My finger nail won’t even catch in it no matter how hard I try along the entire length. I’ll absoltuely say as awesome as it is, I don’t think I’d pay what it would cost to make a gun like that these days. Some day, when I’ve got more money and less that I need to spend raising kids, sure. I’d buy a $2k or $3k hand fitted new gun. Probably just one.

I still have no clue on what this OP is worth, but even with the slight work it needs to correct the unlock timing and that some one reblued it, it feels like way more than the $240 I paid for it.

It is going to be an heirloom gun my kids get. Not something I ever sell. Though I say that now. I am hoping I will say that after my first range visit still.

It does have me really wanting something in .357 and a “matching” .357 lever gun. Maybe it is sacrilege, but I am seriously considering a Chiappa Rhino (maybe 5”). I think I’d go more traditional and look for a GP100 or 686 first. Especially if I could find a good deal on a used one.

All for next year. I’ve spent too much money on guns this year and I just got a $1100 bill for car repairs and the car still needs one more repair that is going to be almost $400. All stuff I just can’t do myself because I don’t have a scan tool to initialize and calibrate crap. I miss when the only computers on a car controlled the fuel injection and spark timing (or there were NO computers).
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