Go Back   Maryland Shooters > The Arsenal > Optics
Don't Have An Account? Register Here

Join MD Shooters

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old July 2nd, 2019, 10:11 AM #11
Magnumite Magnumite is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Harford County, Maryland
Posts: 4,723
Magnumite Magnumite is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Harford County, Maryland
Posts: 4,723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mendicant View Post
I'm curious, how would the user do it? Typically higher end scopes these days will have a parallax adjustment feature included, but what would you do for a fixed parallax scope?

Also, using the factory service department means factory prices and not Amazon prices. I'm not the world's biggest fan of paying retail.

I'm getting a lot of votes for the heavy crosshair here; I think I've got my answer now.
You commented on "paying for" the Kimber rifle, willing to pay $150 to save 2 ounces of weight yet you wil forego a factory service fee to set the parallax. To each their own budgets not withstanding. But after all this effort and consideration, wouldn't the extra $$ for the parallax adjustment be worth it to get the set up you actually desire? It will haunt you...
__________________
There are 1911 pistols and Ruger revolvers. Then there are the others..
Magnumite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 2nd, 2019, 01:44 PM #12
E.Shell's Avatar
E.Shell E.Shell is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: AA & DorCo
Posts: 6,113
E.Shell E.Shell is offline
Senior Member
E.Shell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: AA & DorCo
Posts: 6,113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mendicant View Post
I'm curious, how would the user do it? Typically higher end scopes these days will have a parallax adjustment feature included, but what would you do for a fixed parallax scope?
In using the word "sometimes" above, I had hoped to convey that not all scopes lend themselves to this user service.

The parallax adjustment occurs in a fixed parallax scope in exactly the same manner in which parallax is adjusted in an AO scope: the objective lens position is shifted fore/aft to achieve the desired setting. Mechanically speaking, the objective lens carrier is moved via temporarily loosening the forward lock ring and threading the objective lens in /out and re-locking, vs a cam controlling this same motion.
Quote:
Also, using the factory service department means factory prices and not Amazon prices. I'm not the world's biggest fan of paying retail.
How so? Whether you pay retail has nothing to do with having the service department tweak the scope parallax for you so that the device suits its intended purpose. They'll still work on a scope you were gifted, bought at a discounter, or even one you bought used...

As I had said above, for close range, the parallax setting of 60 yards will not be an issue. It is far more satisfactory to exceed your parallax setting with regard to distance than to try to shorten it up. This is the entire reason that shotgun, muzzleloader and rimfire scopes are set to the closer distances these firearms are typically used for. A centerfire rifle scope with fixed parallax set for 100-150 yards is an absolute disaster when used on a .22 at 25-50 yards. A scope with its parallax setting at 60 yards will be just fine for big game at 100.

Something many people are unaware of is just how critical parallax becomes in high magnification scopes, vs how forgiving a low powered scope really is. It has to do with the depth of field being critically shortened as we increase magnification. The shorter your depth of field, the more critical its placement, thus the fact that one very seldom finds adjustable parallax on scopes with less than 10x maximum magnification - its importance diminishes with magnification. The 6x scopes used for VFS benchrest are a notable exception, due to the need for utmost precision.
Quote:

I'm getting a lot of votes for the heavy crosshair here; I think I've got my answer now.
Variable light conditions, speed...no other choice unless you like a post. With a good quality, low magnification scope with a reasonable size objective lens, the first portion of the image to disappear with low light will be the finer reticle features.

Be sure your rifle is adjusted to bring the scope to your eye without having to look for the image. Comb height and LOP are critical to set first, then eye relief.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnumite View Post
You commented on "paying for" the Kimber rifle, willing to pay $150 to save 2 ounces of weight yet you wil forego a factory service fee to set the parallax. To each their own budgets not withstanding. But after all this effort and consideration, wouldn't the extra $$ for the parallax adjustment be worth it to get the set up you actually desire? It will haunt you...
This too....
__________________
The beatings will continue until morale improves.

"None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free" - J. W. Von Goethe
E.Shell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 2nd, 2019, 02:27 PM #13
atblis atblis is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,146
atblis atblis is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,146
I am a big fan of the Japanese Weavers though admittedly I haven't bought one for quite a while and they might not be the scope they used to be.

Sightron makes a solid scope. SIII is my current go to.

Seen too many failures with Nikons to trust one on a hunting rifle.

Leupold Vx3i 2.5-8x36 is about the perfect hunting scope IMO. Got a couple of those. Compact enough for low enough mounting to allow proper cheek weld.
atblis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 4th, 2019, 10:53 PM #14
Mendicant's Avatar
Mendicant Mendicant is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Baltimore/Silver Spring
Posts: 38
Mendicant Mendicant is offline
Junior Member
Mendicant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Baltimore/Silver Spring
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDHunter View Post
Where in the state are you hunting, and are you hunting with a guide or going on your own? Alaska's regulations vary widely by game management unit in terms of what constitutes a legal bull moose for non-resident hunters. Some units require a minimum of 50" antler width, or 4 brow tines on a side; some units require 50" or 3 brow tines; and some units are any bull is legal.
Self-guided, but two in the party have done this before. 20E. As a non-resident, I need 50" antlers or antlers with 4 or more brow tines on at least one side.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MDHunter View Post
What dates are you hunting? Expect to have temps ranging from highs in the 50s (and possibly 60s on a sunny day) to lows in the 20s (and possibly teens) at night.
Flights are from Sept. 7-18

Quote:
Originally Posted by MDHunter View Post
I used to hunt up there with a Winchester Model 70 .30-06, still have that rifle and really like it. I switched to a Ruger Model 77 in .338 Winchester Magnum back in 2006, since we seemed to see plenty of grizzlies each fall. Here's a pic of the nice one we ran off the long ridge where we were camped in 2017; he was within 1/2 mile of camp, and we were going to be there another 10 days, so better to have a standoff in broad daylight versus dancing with him in the dark...
I will keep that advice in mind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MDHunter View Post
Good luck, hunting remote Alaska is one big adventure!
That is what I am hoping for.
Mendicant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 4th, 2019, 10:58 PM #15
Mendicant's Avatar
Mendicant Mendicant is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Baltimore/Silver Spring
Posts: 38
Mendicant Mendicant is offline
Junior Member
Mendicant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Baltimore/Silver Spring
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcfixer View Post
30-06 is the great rifle caliber--with 180 gr or 200 gr bullets. NO need for expensive bullets and ammo. Like Doug Marcaida,says on "Forged in Fire" TV....I will KKeeellll.
The way I see it, anything that has been around for over a hundred years and is still widely used must be highly effective.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pcfixer View Post
BTW a Nikon ProStaff BDC is a great all around scope 4X12 by 40
I haven't used mine yet, but I picked it up from the classifieds over at Maryland Whitetail a few years back. I am certain it will be thrown into circulation one of these seasons.
Mendicant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2019, 05:35 PM #16
MDHunter MDHunter is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Frederick
Posts: 660
MDHunter MDHunter is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Frederick
Posts: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mendicant View Post
Self-guided, but two in the party have done this before. 20E. As a non-resident, I need 50" antlers or antlers with 4 or more brow tines on at least one side. Flights are from Sept. 7-18
Are you flying out with 40 Mile Air, Zach from Tok Air Service, or someone else? I will be up in that general area, doing a flyout caribou hunt out of Tok this year. We are scheduled to fly out on August 29, fly back to Tok on September 5. The 40 Mile moose hunters typically start flying into the field on August 6, the season starts on August 8 in unit 20 for non-res.

It can be tough judging the moose in that part of the state. they have some big ones, but typically the antlers bow in just a little, making judging the 50" minimum a little challenging. We always hoped for 4 brow tines, easier to count those than measure 50".

Good luck, temps have been abnormally warm in Alaska over the past weeks, hope things cool down before hunting season.
MDHunter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2019, 12:00 PM #17
Mendicant's Avatar
Mendicant Mendicant is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Baltimore/Silver Spring
Posts: 38
Mendicant Mendicant is offline
Junior Member
Mendicant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Baltimore/Silver Spring
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDHunter View Post
Are you flying out with 40 Mile Air, Zach from Tok Air Service, or someone else? I will be up in that general area, doing a flyout caribou hunt out of Tok this year. We are scheduled to fly out on August 29, fly back to Tok on September 5. The 40 Mile moose hunters typically start flying into the field on August 6, the season starts on August 8 in unit 20 for non-res.

It can be tough judging the moose in that part of the state. they have some big ones, but typically the antlers bow in just a little, making judging the 50" minimum a little challenging. We always hoped for 4 brow tines, easier to count those than measure 50".

Good luck, temps have been abnormally warm in Alaska over the past weeks, hope things cool down before hunting season.
I believe the plan is to fly into Fairbanks and drive. One in our party is planning to drive all the way in from Iowa, so we will have a vehicle available. From the road, it is going to be a long, long walk to camp. This is why I want to have the lightest rifle I can get away with.
Mendicant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2019, 01:28 PM #18
MDHunter MDHunter is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Frederick
Posts: 660
MDHunter MDHunter is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Frederick
Posts: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mendicant View Post
I believe the plan is to fly into Fairbanks and drive. One in our party is planning to drive all the way in from Iowa, so we will have a vehicle available. From the road, it is going to be a long, long walk to camp. This is why I want to have the lightest rifle I can get away with.
Got it - if you don't or haven't typically used trekking poles, considering buying (or borrowing) an inexpensive pair and taking them with you. Makes walking with a loaded pack MUCH easier on the knees. Plus if/when you're packing a load of meat, you can lean over on the poles and give your back and hips a break without having to sit down and stand up again.
MDHunter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2019, 08:20 AM #19
midnightSGT's Avatar
midnightSGT midnightSGT is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Calvert County
Posts: 448
midnightSGT midnightSGT is offline
Member
midnightSGT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Calvert County
Posts: 448
Which ever scope you choose, be certain that it is 100 percent Fog Proof, and buy flip up caps. You will be getting wet and you dont need fogged up lenses when your
trying to get a shot of a lifetime! Or, need to save your ass on a charging brown bear!
midnightSGT is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

  Home Page > Forum List > The Arsenal > Optics


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
2019, Congregate Media, LP Privacy Policy Terms of Service