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Old May 22nd, 2020, 04:31 PM #1
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Lend-Lease Savage Enfield No.4 Mk.1*:

At the same auction that Mawkie picked up his Gendarme marked Dreyse, I snagged a sporterized Lee Enfield No4 Mk1* that hammered at a pretty fair price despite the missing magazine.
  • Tuns out that the listing info and pictured didn't really give much detail. It turned out to be a 1942 Savage-made Lee Enfield No.4 Mk.1* Lend-Lease rifle that is NOT import marked. In fact, the pressure proof marks are at the tip of the barrel and intact which is great since importers usually cover them up with importation marks.
  • The forearm was chopped with all the stock hardware missing, and to make matters worse, it was coated with varnish over shellac.
  • Luckily, the butt wasn't messed with outside of being covered over, and once I dissolved the varnish and shellac, all the stamps showed up in very good detail.
  • I was able to find ALL of the missing parts with the correct Savage markings to bring it back to life. NOS forearm, NOS rear hand guard (which is darker than I'd like, so I'm going to go for a used Savage marked one to see if it gets any better) used front guard, sling swivels, etc. all properly marked.
  • Waiting on the correct magazine which is on order. I have a pro-mag in there for a placeholder at the moment.
  • This rifle is just after the switch from the 300-600 flip sight to the micro-adjustible sight that the British preferred. It's also right around the point where Savage stopped serializing the bolts to individual rifles to save time.
  • Overall I'm happy with how everything has turned out. The bore is minty and I can't wait to get out and see how it does. Only other thing missing is the front swivel which I had to get re-shipped as they sent the wrong one.

Here are the before pictures:



Closeup of the poor finish:



US Property Lend-Lease Marking:


Savage "Square S" mark, serial with the "c" for the Stevens factory in Chicopee Falls, date stamp, and Ordnance Corps "flaming bomb."


Pressure testing proof marks:


Finished product:

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Old May 22nd, 2020, 04:38 PM #2
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Looks nice!
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Old May 22nd, 2020, 04:44 PM #3
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Great restoration.
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Old May 22nd, 2020, 06:39 PM #4
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Nice job! I own a few no 4 rifles and they are all manufactured by Savage.
The serial no on your rifle according o info I have was made in between Jan-Feb 1943. The proof marks on the barrel usually mean they were sold out of service and sometimes you will see one with the word England on it usually on the left side of the rifle somewhere.
A lot of S marked rifles went to South Africa and will have a U mark with serif's sometimes on the bottom metal or small parts. Some went to Turkey too.
On the knoxform you can find a crossed SA and a larger U for the African ones. Savage barrels will also a very tiny shell and flame just like whats on the body or wrist but very small. I need a magnifying glass to see them anymore for the smallest types and they almost look like a deep dent without a magnifier.

I never heard of a bolt being left unnumbered while in service but these rifles were and still are all over the place.
Sometimes Savage didn't mark magazine boxes or yo will find one with a barred out number and then re-serialed to the rifle thats wearing it and it will be correct.
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Old May 22nd, 2020, 07:18 PM #5
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It's too bad Bubba got to so many wonderful relics. Terrific restoration job tallen702. You should be proud!
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Old May 22nd, 2020, 07:19 PM #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doco Overboard View Post
Nice job! I own a few no 4 rifles and they are all manufactured by Savage.
The serial no on your rifle according o info I have was made in between Jan-Feb 1943. The proof marks on the barrel usually mean they were sold out of service and sometimes you will see one with the word England on it usually on the left side of the rifle somewhere.
A lot of S marked rifles went to South Africa and will have a U mark with serif's sometimes on the bottom metal or small parts. Some went to Turkey too.
On the knoxform you can find a crossed SA and a larger U for the African ones. Savage barrels will also a very tiny shell and flame just like whats on the body or wrist but very small. I need a magnifying glass to see them anymore for the smallest types and they almost look like a deep dent without a magnifier.

I never heard of a bolt being left unnumbered while in service but these rifles were and still are all over the place.
Sometimes Savage didn't mark magazine boxes or yo will find one with a barred out number and then re-serialed to the rifle thats wearing it and it will be correct.
No "England" marking on it anywhere. I've got a numbered magazine coming, but have a bid in on an un-numbered Savage-marked mag that I hope will win it.

I've seen a few of these without serials on the bolts, most seem to be around the same time as this one (Early '42). The bolt is clearly "S" marked and the bolt head is numbered, so I don't know if it was just some sort of change in production procedures to save time or what.

The interesting thing about the original forearm on it (that had been cut and coated) is that it had a field repair of a screw through it where the forearm had cracked at some point. Similar placement to an "Ishapore screw" but professionally done (well made cut with a forstner bit to counter-sink, etc.) So I feel like it saw some action to have that kind of damage, but who knows. There was a big chunk missing forward of the mag-well that had been filled in by the previous owner prior to the shellac and varnish treatment. I'll grab a picture when I get a chance to show you what I mean.

Edit: Here are the shots of the old forearm:
Filler where there's a cross-screw and a chunk missing from forward of the guard and well inletting.





Here you can see where wood was expertly replaced and spliced in. My guess is the screw runs through it to support and keep it tight.


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Old May 22nd, 2020, 07:46 PM #7
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Was it a metal screw, kind of like a weird dry wall screw with course threads? You can find Indian or Pakistani rifle timber that has that screw in them like that.

I would save the old fore-end because you never know what it will come in handy for. Even if its just for an example for how the draws have been repaired or what they are supposed to look like if they are in good shape. Then you ca copy the work when you get another one, they seem to multiply somehow.

A British or Canadian fore end repair would have a wood plug glued through that started out square, then roughly tapered and rounded to the diameter of the hole drilled through the wood. Then glued with white glue.
On the square part you can see the wood grain easier and then when its made off flush you can hardly tell its been done.
Some of those old rifles have had an amazing amount of wood work done to them.
They're really fun to work on and then shoot.
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Old May 22nd, 2020, 07:57 PM #8
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I see it now, If you look real close you can also see where the bottom third of the knox has been patched if that's what#3 and 4 photo is showing.
They rarely wasted a thing if they didn't have to!
Depending on how much of the fore end remains a Canadian rifle will be enter bedded if it went through the shops after the war and after it was approved.
Bubba could have whacked that part off in a fit of deer hunting rage making the accuracy mods needed for the extreme performance necessary in that sort of endeavor.
God bless him.
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Old May 22nd, 2020, 09:08 PM #9
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Good save! Nice to see you have managed to scrounge everything necessary to bring it back to original configuration. And it didn't take forever, unlike most of my projects. Unusual to find one w.o. import marks. And the pressure proof marks on the barrel meant it was in private hands in the UK at some point. Though I can't ever remember seeing them on a No4 before. On No1s and Metfords, yes. Interesting.
This is the 2nd auction I can remember where many of the items suffered from poor storage. There were two interesting Finn MNs in this one that suffered from rust, a stepped barrel M24 and a very early 1893 dated Sesty.
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Old May 22nd, 2020, 09:43 PM #10
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Glad you were able to bring her back - looks so much nicer in the new clothes!
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