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Old August 12th, 2009, 11:37 AM #1
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AR-15 build info.

So, a lot of the people who join us for our Carroll County festivities have expressed interest in learning to build/maintain an AR-15. I'm starting this thread to give a little insight into what has worked for me, and what has not. This is in no way "gospel", just my opinion. A lot of this info. can be found on ar15.com, but it's much friendlier here. ;-)

What this is - a basic guideline to BUILDING an AR-15. Parts selection, things to look for, etc. It's been mentioned before, but "parts aint parts". The consensus has been to build a quality rifle that can handle carbine courses and be reliable. There are parts/rifles out there that are ideal for this, and there are others that work well for the occasional range shooter, as well.

What this is NOT - an ar15.com "just get a Colt" argument. We all know Colt makes great rifles. Lots of other vendors do, too. We're talking about building a quality rifle, not buying one from a shop.

With that said, if anyone has any good info. to add, please do so. There's more than one way to skin a cat, and same with building a really good rifle.


Lowers:

For the most part, lowers are lowers. As long as it doesn't say Olympic, Vulcan, or Hesse on it. There are 2 types of lowers - Billet and Forged. There are some differences between the two. Billet lowers are forged from one piece of solid aluminum - not forged or casted. It is said that this makes the reciever stronger, but I've never broken a receiver - billet or forged. Also, billet recievers usually have an enhanced trigger guard machined into them. This is VERY cool. If you do a lot of shooting, you will wind up shooting with gloves. Yes, there are aftermarket trigger guards that you can put on a forged lower (highly recommended), but this must be done carefully. If you apply too much pressure to the wrong place, you can break off one of the "ears" of your trigger guard. I've seen it happen, and it sucks. Looks funny, too. Billet recievers also tend to be more cosmetically appealing than forged lowers. The receivers tend to be a "deeper" black, and color match very well with most of the higher end uppers and upper groups. Lastly, Billet lowers tend to run about $100 more than forged lowers.

One important note about lowers - most lowers are made by 6 or 7 manufacturers, and then stamped with the name of the company that they are being built for. Don't buy into some of the nonsense of one lower being better than another until you know for certain who REALLY made it. A few months ago, Noveske lowers were selling for $600 - and they were the same lower as many of their lesser regarded competitors. Below are some lowers that I've worked with, and what I have noticed as good or bad about them.

Mega Machine - Forged. GREAT lowers. Mega makes a lot of lowers for a lot of companies. One of the best looking forged lowers I've ever seen. No parts issues, everything within spec. Nice, tight fit with most uppers I've used. Cosmetically, they look almost as nice as a billet lower. Nice, deep black color. Color matches most uppers I've used. Seen them anywhere from $100-$180. You can find them on the Internet for $100, but don't forget the transfer fees.

Rock River - Forged. Good lower to start a build with. Nothing outstanding about them, but certainly nothing wrong with them, either. Fit well w/ Rock River uppers, acceptable fit with other manufacturers. Cosmetically, they don't match well with other manufacturers. Kinda have a grayish/black color to them. $150-200.

DPMS - Forged. I've never had an issue with DPMS lowers, but some people have - and they've gotten a bad rep because of some QC issues in the past. I have 2 DPMS lowers (.308) and they are well made. DPMS's .308 stuff might be higher quality than their .223/5.56 stuff, though. $130-$150.

Spikes Tactical - Forged. I think they are made by Mega Machine, so everything above applies. About $100-$120. I've seen some local shops asking $260... Spikes has a cool spider stamp on them, but it's not that cool...

Tactical Innovations - Billet. TI's billet lowers are awesome. TI throws in a couple of features that most manufacturers don't provide. There's an "upper tensioning screw" that will tighten up the play between the lower and upper. This lower also has a rear pin detent capture screw. Prevents your rear takedown pin from shooting off as soon as you take the stock off. Lastly, there are a couple of "finger rests" on the left and right side of the reciever. Kind of an index point for your trigger finger when you're not shooting. We all know - unless you are actually shooting, your finger shouldn't be on the trigger... Finish is awesome, fit with most/all uppers is flawless w/ the tensioning screw, and these lowers sport a nice, deep black that matches most billet uppers. $260.

Tactical Innovations - Forged. These lowers have many of the same features as their billet counterparts, but there are a couple of issues I've had with them. First, the bolt catch groove is cut too short. Made it difficult for the bolt catch to hold the bolt back. I had to file a bit of the bolt catch button off to make it work. Worked fine after doing this. Second, these are some UGLY receivers. The color is grayish/green/black. Doesn't match anything. $125-$140.

Larue - Billet. No special features, but this is the prettiest lower I've ever seen. SUPER tight fit with Larue uppers. Unfortunately, you have to buy a Larue upper to be able to order one. $250.

Smith and Wesson - Forged. S&W stands behind their products. This lower is no exception. Everything to spec, everything is as it should be, and they work with anything. You may be paying a few extra dollars for the name, though. Around $160-180.

POF - Billet. SUPER nice lower. WAY overpriced, though. Everything functions flawlessly. Their trigger guard is actually a bit larger than other billet trigger guards. Is that worth $325-$370? You decide.

There are plenty of other lowers out there as well - if anyone has anything good or bad to say about any of the above, or anything not mentioned here - please post and let us know.


Lower Parts Kits:

Lower parts kits are extremely important. Unlike lowers, all parts kits are NOT the same! When you buy a parts kit - make sure it's in the manufacturer's SEALED bag or plastic. I've seen so many people ripped off at gun shows w/ "parts kits" in a ziploc baggie... Here's a rundown on what I've used.

DPMS - Most shops carry this kit. It's good. Not great. I have used a few of them, but if I had other options, I would probably choose one of the others below. $65-$70.

RRA - Good parts kit. Kind of the standard. Not as easy to find locally, but several good online vendors have it. $70-$75.

CMMG - Outstanding. If you can find one, grab it. $65-$70. I'd love to see some local shops start stocking this kit.

LMT - Outstanding. Same comments as CMMG. I Don't think you can get them anymore unless you buy a LMT lower, though. Watch out for someone selling these at gun shows - chances are, it's a bag of junk. Don't know what the cost is.

Stag - Good quality parts. $65-$75.

Colt - IF you can find them, I don't think you can do any better. VERY expensive. $200-$250. Ouch.


Triggers:


Alright! I have a beer in hand, the baby is asleep, so let's talk about triggers. Most of you know this already, but there are actually THREE types of triggers. Single stage, two-stage, and crappy, creepy stock triggers. ;-) Needless to say, this is one of the most important upgrades for your rifle. Include trigger work/trigger upgrades in your rifle budget. One more thing - again, this is not a post to advocate one type of item or another, and I'm only writing up the items that I have personal experience with. The only thing I will tell you is - if you get a stock rifle, get a new trigger. If you get an honest support rep on the phone with most rifle manufacturers - they will tell you point blank that the trigger isn't that good, and the only thing they test is to make sure the rifle goes "bang". The most important thing about choosing a trigger is to determine what YOU like, and how you plan to shoot. There are proponents for single stage and two stage. Don't listen to what anyone says, and don't buy into the ar15.com nonsense. Get out to a meet and greet and feel them both out. If I'm around, I would be happy to let you shoot anything I have (just don't sweep me with my own rifle, plx...) As I mentioned before - take into account HOW you plan to shoot. If you're just a plinker, awesome. No real worries - get whatever feels good, and makes you shoot better. If you plan to do Service Rifle competitions, remember that there is a 4.5 lb trigger pull minimum. 3-gunners and action shooters (like me) like quick triggers with fast lock times and lighter trigger weights. Carbine courses and guys who really get dirty may prefer a heavier trigger weight (just so you know - unintentional discharges are frowned upon...) A precise trigger will do more to improve your accuracy than just about any other upgrade. Oh - a note about trigger pins. Most lowers use the standard .154 diameter pins. Some Colt AR's use the larger ones. Make sure you know what your pin size is before your order a trigger. Think about these things BEFORE you order your trigger.

Timney - GREAT single stage trigger. Crisp, durable, and fast lock times. Come in 2 flavors - standard and skeletonized. The skeletonized is sexy-looking, but more expensive. I have seen them in 3# and 4# for both styles. ZERO creep. One-piece installation. So easy even a cave-man can do it... These triggers are NOT adjustable, though. Prices vary, so do your shopping wisely. $180-$270.

Rock River NM 2-stage - This is a great affordable, 2-stage trigger. I know a few people who have had some issues with them, but I haven't. A couple of the folks who did have issues - it was because they didn't install them properly. I don't believe these are adjustable, though. $120-$130.

JP Modular Fire Control Trigger - This is one sweet single stage trigger. One-piece, drop in unit. Adjustable from 3.5-4.5 pounds. Lightning fast lock time. Widely considered one of the best in the business. You will pay for it, though. $280-$300.

Jewel 2-stage match trigger - another crazy good trigger. LOTS of adjustments. Think about this - if you don't like tweaking and fine tuning, you won't like adjustable triggers. If you do - this one is a fastball down the middle. If you like the 2-stage feel, it doesn't get much better than this. $170-$200.

Geissele triggers - Super sexy, non-adjustable triggers. Geissele makes 3 different 2-stage triggers, for 3 different purposes. Unlike the Jewel, which is tuneable, these are not, hence the 3 versions. They make a DMR version (1.3-3# first stage, .5-1.5# 2nd stage), a match version (1.3-3# first stage, 4-14 OUNCE 2nd stage), , and a service verion (3.2-5# first stage, .5-1.5# 2nd stage), . These triggers smoke every other 2-stage trigger for lock times. This is one of the most highly regarded triggers available. Take a look at their offerings, determine what pull weight you want, and plunk down some change. Each of the 3 variants feel drastically different. $269-$299.

Alexander Arms Tactical Trigger - This is a VERY tough single stage trigger. Very crisp - more for service type rifles. It's not gonna fail. It's also got some bling, in that it's stainless. ;-) Adjustable 3-5# pull weight. $189 at MidwayUSA.

Bill Springfield - I've never used him for trigger work, but this guy says he can make a stock trigger feel as good as one of the above mentioned triggers for $50. Now, I don't know how long they will last, but I shot one of his trigger jobs, and I swore it was a JP... $50 plus shipping makes for something that might be worth taking a look at... www.triggerwork.net.


Upper assemblies:


All right! It's Friday, I've got beer, and I want to talk about rifles! On to the next topic - complete uppers. I'm not going to go into details about building an upper from the reciever on up - I'm going to concentrate on complete uppers, the different types of gas systems, and the most important thing - the Bolt Carrier Group. This section is going to be a bit long - but this is where you're gonna drop most of your cash on your rifle.

Before you purchase your upper - what kind of rifle are you building? Short-Barreled Rifles (SBR's) are rifles with barrels less than 16" - they are awesome, quick handling, and fun - but you get to pay ATF $200 to build it. http://www.mdshooters.com/showthread.php?t=4754 (Thanks Jeep for putting that post together.) SBR's are made for close quarters shooting, and are pretty darned effective out to medium ranges. Carbines come in a couple of flavours - 14.5" (this is a true M4) and 16" lengths. All three types of rifles previously mentioned tend to use a carbine length gas system. The 14.5 and 16" can also use a midlength gas system. The 14.5 M4 is a really sweet upper - one of my personal favorites. Remember though - 16" is the shortest legal limit for a barrel w/o NFA getting some of your cash. There is an easy way around this, though. Get a 14.5 barreled upper, and have a competent gunsmith pin your flash hider (if there are any gunsmiths in our dealer connection, they will know exactly what you are trying to do - give them a call). A Vortex flash hider brings your barrel length to 16.1 sweet inches of rifle goodness, and is 100% legal. Pinning the flash hider kills your ability to add most suppressors, though. Keep that in mind as you build your rifles. Your barrel length does NOT include the flash hider, unless it's pinned. So - when you purchase that 16" upper w/ an A2 birdcage, your rifle is closer to 18" than 16"... Special Purpose Rifles tend to be 18"-24" in length. SPR's have middy (18") or rifle length gas systems, and tend to be your precision type AR's. That's not saying that a 16" isn't precise - that would be far from the truth. Some of the uppers I am going to list below can shoot one hole at 200 yards with the right shooter and optics. In fact, I think all of them can.

Alright - a quick note on gas systems. I'm going to quote a passage from Sabre Defense's website on the differences between the 3 types of gas systems:

Quote:
What is the difference between the carbine-length, mid-length (M5), and rifle-length gas systems?
For simplicity, we will save the in-depth technical information for your further research. There are several postings and discussions on many of the forums and chats available on this subject on the Internet. Here is our simple and plain explanation. The carbine-length (M4) gas tube is 7 long, the mid-length (M5) tube is 9 long, and the rifle-length is 12 long. The pressures at the gas ports are higher for the shorter lengths and lower for the longer lengths. The front sight distance and length of hand guards are also normally limited to the gas system of the rifle. We choose the mid-length gas system for the majority of our rifles because it offers advantages over the shorter, carbine-length gas systems and remains reliable for the shorter-length barrel configurations.
In the king's english, that means the longer the gas system, the more rail/handguard space you have, and the less recoil. MIDLENGTH GAS SYSTEMS ROCK! If you have the option on your carbine build, go with a midlength gas system. You won't regret it. Now - .223 really doesn't kick that hard, but when you start really having fun with double taps, quick follow up shots, etc... That's where a longer gas system shines. More rail space also means more room for accessories, etc. Just remember - the gas block is going to take up some space, too. For general reference, you shouldn't use a midlength system on a barrel shorter than 14.5".

Barrel build and composition is another biggie. You want to look for a barrel that has 410 steel or better and HPI and MPI tested (see below for explanations - I put this paragraph in after I finished the rest of this section...) Barrel twist is a HUGE issue. Basically, for today's modern cartridge loads, look for a 1:7 or 1:8 twist. These barrels can stabilize the heavier loads of these modern cartridges. 1:9 is fine, but don't go any slower than that. 1:10 or greater - keep looking. Finally, look for a 5.56 chambered barrel, or a .223 "Wylde" chambered barrel. They can both shoot 5.56 and .223 ammo without issues. A .223 standard barrel can shoot 5.56, but SHOULD NOT shoot 5.56 ammo, due to the higher pressures associated w/ 5.56 ammo. Lastly - if you are running a 16" or shorter barrel, you want M4 feed ramps. Carbine and midlength gas systems cycle faster than rifle length gas systems, so these feed ramps help the bolt to load the cartridge from the magazine properly.

Okies - before I give you my opinion on the different uppers, let's chat briefly about bolts, and bolt carrier groups (BCG's). Simply put - this is THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF YOUR RIFLE. You want a BCG that has the key properly staked (the connecting bolts are "staked" so that they can't back out), high pressure tested (HPI), magnetic particle inspected (MPI) and is chrome lined. Make sure the extractor has a heavy duty spring, and a heavy duty O-ring to go with it. Do not settle here. A BCG or a bolt that malfunctions will make for an awful day. It can ruin your rifle, and well... If you need your rifle to work, you need this part to work. When you buy your upper - get an extra BCG. I once overheard a vendor at a gun show telling someone that "red loctite is just as good as staking". The vendor was selling unstaked BCG's, obviously. I usually won't make a scene, but I had to say something. Last time I checked, the way you loosen red loctite is with heat. Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't firing a cartridge through a rifle nothing more than a controlled explosion? And don't explosions generate HEAT?!?! Doing lots of rapid fire drills will rip that loctite right off, and ruin your rifle, your day, and possibly hurt someone. Lastly - run your rifles WET. Use good lubricant, and spray some in there every chance you get when you are shooting. There's no excuse not to. Just don't settle on these issues. Alright - enough about stupid gun show vendors. On with the good stuff! In no particular order...

Noveske - These are some of the best - if not the best - uppers out there. Noveske pitches their products as duty quality, precision components. No argument from me. I'd buy a Noveske in less than a heartbeat. Lots of different options, all well made, and you can bet your life that it's gonna work the way it's intended. Expensive, though. Expect to pay at least $1000, up to $1800 for one of their uppers. BCG's are top notch, as well.

Larue - This is one superb upper group. Every bit as good as Noveske. All of the Noveske stuff applies - a tad bit cheaper. Expect to pay about $1300 for a complete upper, including BCG and charging handle. I used their 18" barrel w/ 13.2" rails for my SPR/competition rifle. Their uppers include full length rails and are all mid/rifle length gas systems. Outstanding BCG.

BCM - These guys make quality stuff. I've got BCM uppers on 2 rifles (one SBR, one 14.5 carbine). These uppers are meant to be run HARD. Never seen one break down. BCG's are stellar. Lots of different configurations - you can basically get a fully assembled upper minus rails/handguards for $475, or you can get a pre-built super sweet upper for about $900, minus the BCG and charging handle. Get one, shoot it until your finger breaks off.

RRA - Nothing wrong here, either. I'd prefer a little bit tighter of a twist rate, but these uppers won't let you down. BCG's aren't up there with Larue, Noveske, Young, or BCM, but they aren't bad, either. RRA keeps coming up in every section - there's a reason for this. $600-$900.

DPMS - I'm not going to say anything bad about DPMS. Most of their uppers are built for sport shooting. I wouldn't want to run one through a carbine course. BCG's are suspect. I've heard of some issues with them, but my .308 BCG's run like crazy. Of course, I'm not running around doing rapid fire drills with a .308 AR, either. $600-$1500.

Stag Arms - Right up there w/ RRA, IMO. Good parts, offer left versions, too. If you get a lefty upper, get some spare lefty BCG's... You cannot use a standard BCG b/c the extractor will be on the wrong side. $450-$850.

There are a LOT of other quality uppers, but these are the ones that I have knowledge of. If you purchase an upper w/o a BCG, head on over to Bravo Company or get one of the local shops to order you a BCG from Bravo or Dan Young. Make sure your key is staked properly, lube it up, and go shooting!


Handguards:


Alright - let's see... Handguards. Wait - okay. Fresh beer. I'm good. This section won't be nearly as long as the uppers, just because there isn't as much to go over. The most important thing a handguard does is pull heat away from the barrel without barbequeing your hands. Handguards come in several sizes, usually corresponding to the length of your gas system. There are 3 types of handguards widely used - A2 (and A2 style handguards), tactical (railed) handguards, and free-float handguards. Free float handguards are usually railed handguards, but there are some other exotic types as well, like carbon fiber guards, etc. Again, the most important thing to ask yourself is - "what do I want to do with my rifle?" Once you know that, you'll start thinking of accessories to use to make the rifle suitable to your needs. Are you a sport shooter, competitive shooter, or range sniper? You'll probably want a bipod. Is the rifle for home defense, SHTF? You'll want a tactical light. Forward grip, maybe? All this really determines what kind of accessories you'll get - and accessories will determine your handguards. If you go with a rail system - do yourself a favor and get some rail covers. Whatever you like - full sized, ladder, etc. You don't want to leave your rails bare. If your rifle gets banged around, it can damage your rails - and if you use your rifle with a sling, those rails can really start to hurt if they hit some exposed skin.

A2 Handguards are your simple, mil-spec handguards with heat shields. They can be drilled to install sling studs (for slings and bipods), and install easily between the delta ring (henceforth referred to as the "donut") and the handguard cap. Do a good job of pulling heat away from the barrel. Nothing special. They work.

Tactical handguards install the same way as the standard A2 guards. The benefit here is that you get additional rail space to install tons of accessories, and they do not require gunsmithing. Simply pull the donut down, pop off your old handguards, and pop on the new tactical rails. No gunsmithing reqired. These types of tactical rails do a great job of hosting all types of accessories. Avoid using these rails to mount optics, though. Since they can shift a bit, mounting optics to them will throw your BZO off. These rail systems cost more than standard A2 guards, but they won't break the bank.

Free float handguards are the shiz. They tend to be lightweight, and they bolt directly to the barrel nut on your rifle. The reason they are freefloat is because they never connect directly to your barrel. They are more expensive, and they require extensive gunsmithing - but they are beautiful. The tactical versions are just the best looking and best performing handguards on the market, IMO. These types of handguards can be retrofitted onto A2 style barrel assemblies, but expect to have to redo your gas system and gas block, as well. There are some rails that are exceptions, though. Low-profile gas blocks were made for these types of railed handguard systems. Unlike the abovementioned tactical rails, you can mount optics to this type of railed guard, since they are bolted and will not shift.

Last note on handguards. Stay away from polymer crap on your handguards (except Magpul). Handguards are supposed to pull heat away from your rifle, not melt. There are some lower-end rail makers (UTG comes to mind) that just make some terrible stuff. You always get what you pay for - and rail systems that are out of spec are a horrible pain in the ass. Alright - on to the prizes! Ladies, show us what's behind those doors! (I'm getting a buzz - sorry for the lame jokes!)

A2 Handguards - the basics. They work just fine. Shouldn't cost more than $20.

Magpul MOE - This is a very attractive, and affordable handguard. It's not a rail system, but you can attach rail segments to the handguards at 12, 3, 6, and 9-o'clock. Very rugged, does a good job with heat, too. A2 style attachment. Since it's Magpul, color matches with Magpul accessories for a super sexy look in FDE or OD. If you don't need rails, you should definitely consider these. I've only seen these in carbine length though. Less than $30.

Yankee Hill Two-Piece Handguards - Yankee Hill is not as highly regarded as some of the other manufacturers, but they should be. Quad rails, light, and easy to install. No gunsmithing - installs just like the A2 guards. VERY affordable, good to excellent quality well made accessories. They get the job done, and they look good doing it, too. $120-$200, depending on rail length.

Daniel Defense Omega - Now we're talking. If you have a Delta ring and don't want to do any gunsmithing - and you want the best... Stop looking and go get this rail system. DD makes the best rail systems on the market (along with Larue). This system is unique, in that it installs like an A2 with no gunsmithing, but also bolts down to eliminate any sort of shift. This is the only rail that does this, and it also has a gooseneck on the back of the rail that bridges the gap over the delta ring between the upper receiver rails and the handguard rails, giving the operator one continuous rail system. That is the definition of cool. This rail also has a QD sling mount integrated. All this coolness comes with a price. Expect to pay $270-$330, depending on rail length. If this is what you want, find it in stock and get it. They are routinely out of stock just about everywhere.

Daniel Defense Lite - These are free float rails, and requires gunsmithing. DD and Larue go toe to toe for the title of best rail systems, and deservingly so. This rail system comes in all the necessary lengths, and just look beautiful. DD also makes a couple of variations to this rail that allow you to keep your A2 front sight. No need to change out your gas blocks. These rails also have the same continuous rail system mounting as their Omega siblings. $300-369. It's worth it, though.

Yankee Hill Free Float rails - Yankee hill doesn't have the "bling" of Larue or DD, but again - they get the job done in nice style. Lightweight, relatively simple install (gunsmithing required) and YHM offers a nice option that others don't - a "spectre" length that installs on a carbine length gas system, but gives the operator a tad more rail space than a midlength system. Nice. $132-176. Not bad on the wallet, either.

Larue Handguards - Here's the other heavyweight. These just look incredible. Super smooth rails, integrated QD swivels, and a very nice locking mechanism for the bolt-up. These are free floated and require gunsmithing, but ooooh... They look soooo good. Function is as hot as their form, too. Larue rails don't have the "Omega" feature, but hey - they work just as well, and look great doing it. Did I mention these were sexy? $284-329.

There are other rail sytems out there from Midwest Industries, Knight's Armament, DPMS, Troy, etc. I'm sure they are good quality. The above is what I have used, though. I can't say anything negative about any of those manufacturers (except UTG - notice they aren't on my list???) Do your homework, do some shopping, and stick with a quality manufacturer. If you don't know how to install a free float handguard, give some of our local gun shops that support this site a ring. They'll have you rolling in a day or two.


*flash hiders coming later this week*

Flash Hiders/Compensators:
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Last edited by Apone; August 18th, 2009 at 07:38 PM. Reason: Continuing...
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Old August 12th, 2009, 12:24 PM #2
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awesome, I have been researching parts to build another AR. I have just bought complete uppers and lowers before. I'll be following this. Thanks!
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Old August 12th, 2009, 12:27 PM #3
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I'll be following this as well. Many thanks for going about the task of making this as easy as possible for AR n00bs such as myself.
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Old August 12th, 2009, 12:30 PM #4
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I am not a big fan of the lower parts kits. Trigger groups are sloppy, not adjustable and are the first thing to go. I just buy the parts piecemeal from brownels or midway so I can get what I need and not waste money on the parts I already know I will replace.

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Old August 12th, 2009, 12:33 PM #5
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Awesome read so far! Thanks! One thing to add: I'm pretty sure RRA sells the upper tensioning screw as well.
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Old August 12th, 2009, 01:14 PM #6
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One lower you forgot to mention is the Stag/CMT.
These are very good lowers, always in spec and can be had for 95.00 to 115.00.
CMT is a primary vendor of lpk's to many agencies and their quality is consistent.
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Old August 12th, 2009, 01:21 PM #7
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I have a tactical innovations forged lower with a CMMG upper and they match, and no issues with the bolt release either...
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Old August 12th, 2009, 01:50 PM #8
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Thanks for the positive feedback! As soon as I get free, I'll put in another couple of sections.

Lax - that's great to hear about TI's forged lower. I'm guessing I just got a bad one. As I mentioned before, this is just my personal experience. Might not be the case for everyone. The TI billet receiver is one of my favs, though.
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Old August 12th, 2009, 02:33 PM #9
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Great Info THANKS!
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Old August 12th, 2009, 04:58 PM #10
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Sounds good brother. I'm glad we agree on everything so far. Add the Mega billet lower. Super bad ass and only abour 180$ plus shipping and transfer. The best deal in billet out there. I've also had good luck with Fulton Armory LPK's but I have no idea who really makes them. Could be DPMS which doesn't bother me since I order the one without the FCG.
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