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Jimbob2.0
December 10th, 2013, 08:11 PM
Anyone use olive oil on their gunstocks in place of linseed? My old man has been swearing about it, but I doubt.

As a test I recently did my kitchen knives and they came out looking better than their previous treatment with boiled linseed.

Thinking of trying it...........I like the organic earthy (and non-exothermic) nature, but I worry about a bunch of rancid oil in my safe.

shaddydan
December 10th, 2013, 08:14 PM
I thought you only used olive oil on Italian guns:innocent0


Seriously, Linseed oil is completely organic.

Mooseman
December 10th, 2013, 08:15 PM
Popeye used Olive Oil on his guns.

mdvctry
December 10th, 2013, 08:18 PM
Ballistol works great also. As you mentioned, olive oil will build up and get rancid over time.

mka2278
December 10th, 2013, 09:11 PM
Eat lotsa potato chips in between rounds and you never need to worry about those stocks.
Seriously, beeswax works real well. Just wipe any excess off and buff with a terry towel.

Boom Boom
December 10th, 2013, 09:17 PM
Olive oil attracts insects unless the safe is air tight. Would suck to open the safe and find it filled with ants.

Jimbob2.0
December 10th, 2013, 09:19 PM
I thought you only used olive oil on Italian guns:innocent0


Seriously, Linseed oil is completely organic.

Not the "solvents" in the boiled variety.

Though seriously, the knives and cutting board are open air so they werent going to go rancid. I worry when I lock 20+ of them up in a safe.

Redcobra
December 10th, 2013, 10:43 PM
Anyone use olive oil on their gunstocks in place of linseed? My old man has been swearing about it, but I doubt.

As a test I recently did my kitchen knives and they came out looking better than their previous treatment with boiled linseed.

Thinking of trying it...........I like the organic earthy (and non-exothermic) nature, but I worry about a bunch of rancid oil in my safe.

Oil her up good, then when you go out in the 98 degree weather next summer to shoot, you can use the oil that comes out for salad dressing. As a wood worker I can tell you that Olive Oil never truly hardens up like BLO.

Jimbob2.0
February 2nd, 2014, 01:43 PM
I have been experimenting with this a little (gradually) and I am actually impressed by the results.

I started with the kitchen knifehandles (rosewood but they get beat fairly hard).

Moved on to an extra M1 carbine stock. Some thoughts:

1. It does a really good job of removing grime from the stocks, well see how it handles overtime.

2. Gives a light gloss, a little more glossy than BLO

3. As it doesnt have a solvent fraction, you have to spend a lot more time rubbing it to remove the greasy feel.

Here are my conclusions. Olive oil actually works quite well as a mild solvent for very vintage guns (doesnt hurt sensitive carbon bluing) and stocks and removes a lot of built up grime. Well see how the test stock looks in a couple months, I can always BLO over it.

cantstop
February 2nd, 2014, 02:12 PM
No, no, no... Don't use food products on your guns.

This is as poorly thought out as putting peanut butter on leather.

Just don't do it.

:facepalm:

Jimbob2.0
February 2nd, 2014, 02:22 PM
No, no, no... Don't use food products on your guns.

This is as poorly thought out as putting peanut butter on leather.

Just don't do it.

:facepalm:

A little more thought out than that, which is why I am testing it on a few extra wood stocks first. Ill tell you one thing, I never saw so much grime come off this stock while leaving the finish intact.

http://www.trapdoorcollector.com/restoration.html

I am not suggesting using this as lube, metal preservative or anything else.

mr phil
February 2nd, 2014, 02:25 PM
Popeye used Olive Oil on his guns.

:lol: :worship::worship::worship::worship:YES...YES....Y ES

Nnztg8r
February 2nd, 2014, 02:29 PM
:lol: :worship::worship::worship::worship:YES...YES....Y ES
I'll have what he's having...

Matt, the gunslinger
February 2nd, 2014, 02:33 PM
I had a rifle that had a good sized scratch on the stock. Having no other oil on hand at the time, olive oil filled the gap. It matched the original stain pretty good. I dunno about doing a whole stock in olive oil but I would most definitely use it to blend in scratches.

Ill have to try that peanut butter on leather next since the olive oil worked so well. :o

coopermania
February 2nd, 2014, 02:52 PM
Olive Oil is one of the oils that can go rancid in a short period of time, And in some cases smell and grown mold and or fungus.
I would not recommend using it on a firearm.

6t5Goat
February 2nd, 2014, 03:16 PM
Mineral Oil will work and won't go rancid... I can be bought at the pharmacy.. they sell it as a laxative..

Bob A
February 2nd, 2014, 04:29 PM
Renaissance wax is a good product for preservation of wood and metal. Even available thru Midway USA. Will not deteriorate into an acidic compound, unlike beeswax and carnauba.

I useit straight on wood; treat metal with Eezox, then wax, for long-term protection.

Olive oil can be used on gut violin strings, BTW, so long as you avoid the bowed areas. Keeps sweat from damaging the strings as quickly.

teratos
February 2nd, 2014, 04:44 PM
Ballistol works great also. As you mentioned, olive oil will build up and get rancid over time.


This. Ballistol is basically a fatty acid with some solvents thrown in to make it easier to apply. The main ingredient (oleic acid) may help lower your cholesterol if you happen to drink it.

Ringmaster
February 2nd, 2014, 10:03 PM
Go to any marine store and buy a bottle of teak oil. It's made to go on wood and it's made to deal with the elements.

stu929
February 2nd, 2014, 10:13 PM
Ting oil has been great for me and no fire hazard.

omegared24
February 2nd, 2014, 10:35 PM
Good friend of the family is 85, smokes like a chimney, and can run circles around me. He swears it is the teaspoon of olive oil he takes every morning.

He also puts a little olive oil in his hair every day. As long as I have known him he has looked the same...almost 40 years.

I am Greek so my olive oil loyalty runs deep but I don't know if I would use it on my guns though.

Maverick0313
February 3rd, 2014, 05:22 AM
Ting oil has been great for me and no fire hazard.

Mix some Tung oil with 100% mineral spirits; used it on my new Garand stock - awesome. :thumbsup:

Pinecone
February 3rd, 2014, 07:00 AM
No, no, no... Don't use food products on your guns.

You do know that linseed oil is consumable?

Linseed oil is an edible oil marketed as a nutritional supplement. In parts of Europe, it is traditionally eaten with potatoes and quark (cheese). It is regarded as a delicacy due to its hearty taste, which enhances the flavour of quark, which is otherwise bland.

Boiled linseed oil is treated to not be consumable, but the base oil is from flax seed.

But the real point is, linseed oil polymerizes. So it slowly thickens into a solid, so it does come out at an oil due to heat.

Mdeng
February 3rd, 2014, 07:34 AM
In my opinion nothing works better than Tom 1/3 mix wax http://www.thegunstockdoctor.com/

sykesville
February 3rd, 2014, 08:59 AM
I think the OP was playing a practical joke. Not funny if anyone actually did put olive oil on their stocks, especially if they sanded them first. I would use olive oil on food, hair, rashes, dry hands... but not on stocks.

rbird7282
February 3rd, 2014, 09:34 PM
No, no, no... Don't use food products on your guns.

This is as poorly thought out as putting peanut butter on leather.

Just don't do it.

:facepalm:

^THIS. Food based oils will become rancid over time.

Use Linseed oil.

Jimbob2.0
February 3rd, 2014, 09:39 PM
I think the OP was playing a practical joke. Not funny if anyone actually did put olive oil on their stocks, especially if they sanded them first. I would use olive oil on food, hair, rashes, dry hands... but not on stocks.

Actually the opposite. You guys think I am nuts but I have worked with CLP, Eezox, Hoppes, Motoroil and I see a role for Olive oil in this equation.

I wish I took some before pictures of my test stock but it looks really nice afterwards! Tremendous degreasing, leaving the cartouches an original woodtone intact.


Well see how it looks after some handling but my inkling is that

1. Olive oil actually works well as a less invasive alternative to modern solvents, its natural solvent properties clean really well.

2. It does have a food like odor which I suspect if overused could become rancid as some have suggested. That said, I know a couple woodworking friends whon use olive oil extensively with no sign of rancidity.

3. Not a preservative, a little olive oil is great for preserving cutting boards nad knives that touch food. But serious wood that sees use and weather outside the kitchen probably needs touched up with BLO (or better yet teak or an oil that lacks BLO's agressive solvent and exothermic properties).

shaddydan
February 3rd, 2014, 09:45 PM
What about raw linseed oil? No driers in that.

Jimbob2.0
February 3rd, 2014, 09:47 PM
What about raw linseed oil? No driers in that.

Id actually like to find some, Ive only worked with BLO and semi-impressed.

Good finish if it takes, but can come out blotchy.

shaddydan
February 3rd, 2014, 09:53 PM
I've only used it a few times but it seemed to work well. It does dry......eventually. I've moved a few times in the past few years. If I can find the quart I have, you are welcome to try it.

Pinecone
February 4th, 2014, 02:10 PM
What about raw linseed oil? No driers in that.

It is still a drying (polymerizing) oil.

It just takes a lot longer.

mvee
February 4th, 2014, 02:36 PM
What about raw linseed oil? No driers in that.

You can also buy raw linseed oil as cold pressed Flax seed oil at Whole foods. It is food grade and I use it to season cast iron skillets.

Streetgang
February 4th, 2014, 02:45 PM
Linseed oil is only slighty more protective than raw wax which is the least protective of any wood finish. Olive oil may clean your finish but it has very little protective qualities at all.
If you guys want an inexpensive and easy to apply finish make your own. Mix equal parts of varnish, boiled linseed oil (BLO), and turpentine (not mineral spirits).

in 1992 I made a cherry coffee table and applied this finish. To this day it still looks new and is a very tough finish.
It's an old standby for me and would do wonders on an old or new stock for refinishing.
Alot of the newfangled "snake oil" finishes you can buy for a ton of money are nothing more than a variation on this finish.

blindnoodle
February 4th, 2014, 03:17 PM
In 3 years everyone at the MDS shoot will know who followed the advice in this thread. The rancid decaying smell will point ya out!

Streetgang
February 5th, 2014, 10:41 AM
In 3 years everyone at the MDS shoot will know who followed the advice in this thread. The rancid decaying smell will point ya out!

:lol2: Yep, olive oil will smell real nice by then.